Stars we’ve lost in 2022

Stars we’ve lost in 2022

Aaron Carter

LOS ANGELES, CA – APRIL 11: Aaron Carter poses for portrait sitting in an Ulloo42 chair at Visual Snow Initiative visits The Artists Projecton April 11, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Michael Bezjian/Getty Images for The Artists Project)

Credit: Michael Bezjian/Getty for The Artists Project

Musician and former child star Aaron Carter was found dead in his Lancaster, Calif., home on Nov. 5. He was 34. Born in Tampa, the singer and rapper catapulted to fame when he opened for his older brother Nick Carter’s band the Backstreet Boys on tour. He released his debut album, Aaron Carter, less than a year later, but his popularity surged after the release of his second album, Aaron’s Party (Come Get It), which included the hits “I Want Candy,” “That’s How I Beat Shaq,” and “Bounce.” In 2001, Carter made his acting debut when he performed “I Want Candy” on the Disney Channel series Lizzie McGuire. He made his Broadway debut that same year as JoJo the Who in the musical Seussical. He released two more records — 2001’s Oh Aaron and 2002’s Another Earthquake — before taking an extended break from music until 2017. Carter released his final album, Love, in 2018. During his career, he also appeared on Sabrina the Teenage WitchAll That, and E!’s reality show House of Carters, which aired for one season in 2006. He also starred on Dancing With the Stars in 2009, placing fifth with his professional partner Karina Smirnoff. Carter, who was arrested on drug charges twice, sought help at multiple treatment facilities throughout his life. He is survived by his son, Prince. 

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David Davis

David Davis, Comedy Writer Who Co-Created ‘Bob Newhart Show‘ and ’Taxi,’ Dies at 86

Emmy-winning writer and producer David Davis died in Los Angeles on Nov. 4, according to The Hollywood Reporter. He was 86. The life-long creative got his start as an associate producer on the 1965 television series O.K. Crackerby! and My Mother the Car. In addition to producing, Davis began writing for television four years later, penning 10 episodes of The Leslie Uggams Show in 1969. He would go on to write and produce a slate of hilarious television series throughout the ’70s, including episodes of The Mary Tyler Moore Show, and develop The Bob Newhart Show (from 1972 to 1978), Rhoda (1974 to 1978), and Taxi (1978 to 1983). Davis is survived by his wife, actress Julie Kavner, and daughter Samantha Davis-Friedman.

Douglas McGrath

Douglas McGrath

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Douglas McGrath, the Oscar- and Tony-nominated writer, director, and actor, died Nov. 3 at 64. A native of Midland, Tex., McGrath began his showbiz career as a writer for Saturday Night Live in 1980 and went on to become a stage-and-screen multihyphenate. He earned a Tony nomination for writing the book Beautiful: The Carole King Musical and garnered an Academy Award nomination for penning Bullets Over Broadway with Woody Allen. McGrath wrote and directed films including Emma, Company Man, and Infamous; helmed two Emmy-nominated documentaries, His Way and Becoming Mike Nichols; and appeared in such movies as Quiz Show, The Insider, and Michael Clayton. At the time of his death, McGrath had been starring in the autobiographical Off Broadway show Everything’s Fine, which he also wrote.

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Julie Powell

Julie Powell

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Julie Powell, the food writer who inspired Nora Ephron‘s 2009 biographical dramedy Julie & Julia, died from cardiac arrest on Oct. 26. She was 49. Powell rose to prominence in 2002 when she launched the Julie/Julia Project on Salon.com, which chronicled her attempt to cook all 524 recipes from Julia Child‘s landmark cookbook Mastering the Art of French Cooking in the course of one year. The success of the blog led to a book deal for Powell, who released Julie and Julia: 365 Days, 524 Recipes, 1 Tiny Apartment Kitchen in 2005. It was later adapted into Ephron’s Academy Award- and Golden Globe-nominated film that starred Amy Adams as Powell and Meryl Streep as Child. Powell is survived by her husband, brother, and parents.

Jerry Lee Lewis

Jerry Lee Lewis in 1957

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Jerry Lee Lewis, the piano-playing music legend who helped create both rock & roll and the notion of the larger-than-life rock star, died Oct. 28 at 87. Born in Ferriday, La., Lewis started recording for the Sun Records label in 1956 and jammed with Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, and Carl Perkins in what became known as the Million Dollar Quartet session. The next year, he became a massive star with the seminal rock & roll tracks “Whole Lotta Shakin’ Goin’ On” and “Great Balls of Fire.” His popularity became deeply damaged when in 1958 he married his 13-year-old cousin, Myra Gale Brown, who filed for divorce in 1970, citing extreme physical and mental abuse. Lewis, however, released a string of successful country singles in the 1960s, and his iconic stature among younger musicians was demonstrated in 2006 with the release of the album Last Man Standing, with guest performers from Bruce Springsteen, Neil Young, Robert Plant, Keith Richards, and Kid Rock. He opened the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s 25th anniversary concert at Madison Square Garden in 2009 and the next year released the album Mean Old Man, which, along with Last Man Standing, marked some of the best album sales of his career. 

Jules Bass

FROSTY THE SNOWMAN, Frosty the Snowman, 1969

Credit: Everett Collection

Jules Bass, the director, producer, and composer behind beloved stop-motion and animated TV specials Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer, Frosty the Snowman, and Santa Claus is Comin’ To Town with partner Arthur Rankin Jr., died Oct. 25. He was 87. With Rankin under their Rankin/Bass Productions company, Bass also co-produced and directed a number of other features, including 1967’s Mad Monster Party, 1968’s The Little Drummer Boy, and 1980’s Pinocchio’s Christmas. In 1977, Bass and Rankin, who died in 2014 at the age of 89, earned Emmy nominations for The Little Drummer Boy Book II and received a Peabody Award later that year for their animated adaptation of The Hobbit.

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Leslie Jordan

Leslie Jordan

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Beloved actor and comedian Leslie Jordan died Oct. 24 at age 67 after reportedly suffering a medical emergency while driving his BMW through Hollywood. In addition to winning an Emmy for his iconic role as Beverley Leslie on the NBC sitcom Will & Grace from 2001-2020, Jordan appeared in the Best Picture-nominated 2011 drama The Help and on three separate seasons of FX’s long-running anthology series American Horror Story.

Michael Kopsa

Michael Kopsa, (L) Executive Producer J.H. Wyham and Anna Torv attend “Fringe” celebrates 100 episodes and final season at Fairmont Pacific Rim on December 1, 2012 in Vancouver, Canada. (Photo by Rich Lam/Getty Images for FOX)

Credit: Rich Lam/Getty

Michael Kopsa, a prolific character and voice actor whose work spanned Beast on X-Men: Evolution to Captain Windmark on Fringe, died on Oct. 23 of a brain tumor. He was 66.

Kopsa would continue to provide voice work for anime and animated series and movies throughout his career, including Dragon Ball Z, Inuyasha, Death Note, Action Man, X-Men: Evolution, Iron Man: Armored Adventures, Planet Hulk, and Ninjago.

The actor played several characters on the sci-fi anthology series The Outer Limits and guest starred on The X-Files in 1997 before landing small roles in blockbuster films like 2005’s Fantastic Four, 2008’s Watchmen, 2011’s Rise of the Planet of the Apes, and Apollo 18. He also had a recurring role on Fringe as Captain Windmark.

Zuri Craig

NEW YORK, NY – OCTOBER 15: Zuri Craig of The CraigLewis Band performs live during Nick Cannon ROCKS For St. Mary’s Kids Event at Hard Rock Cafe – Times Square on October 15, 2015 in New York City. (Photo by Matthew Eisman/WireImage)

Credit: Matthew Eisman/WireImage

Zuri Craig, a finalist who wowed judges on America’s Got Talent and actor who appeared in Tyler Perry films, died Oct. 21 at the age of 44, his family shared. Craig, one half of the singing duo Craig Lewis Band, made his AGT debut during season 10 alongside his music partner Jeffrey Lewis. The dynamic duo impressed judges with their renditions of James Brown’s “This is a Man’s World” and Mary J. Blige‘s “I’m Goin’ Down,” ultimately finishing the competition in fifth place. Craig also appeared in select Perry projects, including Madea’s Big Happy Family, A Madea Christmas, and Madea Gets a Job. 

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Ron Masak

CENTURY CITY, CA – AUGUST 21: Actor Ron Masak arrives at the Eagle & Badge Foundation Gala on August 21, 2010 in Century City, California. (Photo by Paul Archuleta/FilmMagic)

Credit: Paul Archuleta/FilmMagic

Ron Masak, who played Sheriff Mort Metzger on Murder, She Wrote, died on Oct. 20 at 86. He portrayed the Cabot Cove lawman opposite Angela Lansbury, who died earlier this month. Masak also appeared on The Twilight Zone, I Dream of Jeannie, The MonkeesGet SmartBewitchedThe Mary Tyler Moore Show, and Wonder Woman, and had roles in a number of films, including Angels on Tap, The Benchwarmers, Ice Station Zebra, Evel Knievel, and Listen to Me

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Jeff Barnaby

TORONTO, ON – SEPTEMBER 18: Short Cuts Awards jury member Jeff Barnaby speaks on stage at the 2016 TIFF Awards Ceremony at TIFF Bell Lightbox on September 18, 2016 in Toronto, Canada. (Photo by J. Countess/Getty Images)

Credit: J. Countess/Getty

Jeff Barnaby, the acclaimed Canadian Indigenous filmmaker best known for Rhymes For Young Ghouls and Blood Quantum, died Oct. 13 from cancer. He was 46. The director, writer, and composer from the Mi’gmaq community of Listuguj redefined Indigenous cinema by infusing elements of magical realism, horror, and sci-fi to tell stories about Indigenous identity and themes. Barnaby wrote, directed, and edited all of his films, which span From Cherry English, The Colony, File Under Miscellaneous, and Bleed Down. He released his final feature film, Blood Quantum, the apocalyptic horror film that follows a group of Indigenous people who are immune to a zombie plague, in 2019, which swept the 2021 Canadian Screen Awards with six wins, including achievement in editing.

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Mike Schank

Mark Borchardt & Mike Schank at the 2002 Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah. (Photo by Randall Michelson/WireImage)

Credit: Randall Michelson/WireImage

Mike Schank, the musician and actor best known for his appearance in the 1999 cult-favorite documentary American Movie and providing terrifying screams to his cinematic horror work, died Oct. 13 at the age of 56. His close friend Jackie Bogenberger told Milwaukee Journal Sentinel he had been diagnosed with a rare form of cancer roughly three months prior to his death. Schank was most beloved for his involvement in American Movie, which followed filmmaker Mark Borchardt as he set out to make the horror movie Coven despite a barrage of difficulties. Schank appeared as an extra, assistant, friend, and even recorded music for the soundtrack of the documentary. He also starred in the films Storytelling, Hamlet A.D.D., Black Licorice, and appeared as himself in an episode of Family Guy.

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Angela Lansbury

Angela Lansbury

Credit: Casey Curry/Invision/AP/Shutterstock

Angela Lansbury, the iconic stage and screen actress, died Oct. 11 at 96. She was nominated for a Best Supporting Actress Oscar for her first major film role in Gaslight opposite Charles Boyer and Ingrid Bergman, and was up for it again the next year for The Picture of Dorian Gray. She also found success on Broadway in shows such as Mame and Sweeney Todd, winning five Tony Awards and getting a sixth for lifetime achievement. But Lansbury was probably best known for spending 12 years solving crimes as Jessica Fletcher on the CBS series Murder, She Wrote, as well as voicing Mrs. Potts in Disney’s 1991 animated film Beauty and the Beast, in which she and Jerry Orbach sang the Oscar-nominated song “Be Our Guest.”

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Sara Lee

https://www.instagram.com/p/CjTpeCKJPDJ/ saraann_lee Verified Celebrating finally being healthy enough to go to the gym 2 days in a row 👏🥳 first ever sinus infection kicked my butt #Saraselfie #gains

Credit: Sara Lee/Instagram

Sara Lee, a former wrestler known for winning season 6 of the WWE’s reality competition series Tough Enough, died Oct. 6 at the age of 30. Winning Tough Enough earned Lee a one-year contract with WWE. According to Entertainment Tonight, she subsequently competed in eight matches as part of WWE’s NXT development brand. Lee went on to wrestle on the independent circuit. In 2017, she married wrestler Cory Weston. The couple shared three children and a dog.

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Judy Tenuta

Judy Tenuta

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Judy Tenuta, the wisecracking comedian who irreverently styled herself as the “Love Goddess” and “Aphrodite of the Accordion,” died Oct. 6 at 72. The cause was ovarian cancer. A native of Oak Park, Ill., Tenuta got her start in comedy in the ’70s, after taking a class with Chicago’s Second City improv group, and she flourished during a golden age of standup. Over the course of her career Tenuta toured with George Carlin, appeared in several TV specials, received two Grammy nominations for Best Comedy album, and wrote two comedy books. She also did voice work, was a frequent guest on late-night TV, and acted in a number of independent films.

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Jody Miller

Jody Miller

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Jody Miller, the Grammy-winning country star behind songs including “Queen of the House” and “He Walks Like a Man,” died Oct. 6 at 80 from complications related to Parkinson’s disease. A pioneering crossover artist, Miller paved the way for performers such as Linda Ronstadt, Anne Murray, and Olivia Newton-John with her radio-friendly versatility. She began her career in the early ’60s and went on to record songs including “Home of the Brave,” “Long Black Limousine,” “Baby I’m Yours,” “There’s a Party Goin’ On,” and “He’s So Fine.” Miller appeared on such TV shows as Shindig, American Bandstand, and Hee Haw; was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame; and had a high school performing arts center named after her in her hometown of Blanchard, Okla.

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Joan Hotchkis

JOAN HOTCHKIS

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Joan Hotchkis, the veteran actress, performance artist, and playwright, died Sept. 27 of congestive heart failure. She was 95. Born in Los Angeles, in 1927, Hotchkis worked as a preschool teacher in New York City before becoming an actress and making her television debut in the 1954 series The Secret Storm. She made multiple appearances on popular  television shows throughout the ’50s and ’60s, including Frontier, Conflict, and Iron Horse, before returning to California and joining the cast of the Emmy-winning sitcom My World and Welcome To It in 1969. Two years later, Hotchkis starred as Dr. Nancy Cunningham, the sometimes girlfriend of Jack Klugman’s character, on The Odd Couple. In addition to acting, Hotchkis was a talented writer and penned the 1977 acting handbook No Acting Please with Eric Morris. In 1974, she wrote the play Legacy, which chronicled an upper-class housewife’s mental and emotional breakdown and was adapted into a 1975 film. Following the release of Legacy, Hotchkis survived brain surgery and continued performing on stage, in television, and in her performance art piece Tearsheets: Letters I Didn’t Send Home well into the ’90s. Her final screen performance was in 1993’s The Disappearance of Christina.

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Loretta Lynn

2011 Bonnaroo Music And Arts Festival – Day 3

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Loretta Lynn, the sequined country music icon and singer of the classic tune “Coal Miner’s Daughter,” died Oct. 4 at 90. Born in the remote Appalachian town of Butcher Hollow, Ky., Lynn was the second of eight children and grew up in a musical household. She married Oliver “Doolittle” Lynn at 15, and after receiving her first guitar from her husband, released her first hit, “I’m a Honky Tonk Girl,” in 1960. Lynn’s flinty voice and no-nonsense lyrics made her a staple on the Grand Ole Opry. She later signed with Decca and  released more than 50 records for the label over the next 30 years, including country standards like 1967’s “Don’t Come Home a’ Drinkin’ (With Lovin’ on Your Mind)” and the  autobiographical “Coal Miner’s Daughter” in 1970. In 1971, she began an enduring and wildly successful partnership with Conway Twitty, recording a number of hits including 1971’s “After the Fire is Gone” and “Lead Me On” and touring together frequently. In 1972, Lynn became the first woman to ever win the Entertainer of the Year Award from the Country Music Association. In 1976, she released her autobiography Coal Miner’s Daughter, which was later adapted into Michael Apted’s 1980 film of the same name, and she handpicked Sissy Spacek to play her in the movie, for which Spacek won an Oscar. Lynn was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1988 and awarded the Pioneer Award from the Academy of Country Music Awards in 1995. In 2004, she won a solo Grammy for her Jack White collaboration Van Lear Rose, and she was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom from President Barack Obama in 2013. Lynn released her 50th and final album, Still Woman Enough, in 2021.

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Robert Brown

HERE COME THE BRIDES – “How Dry We Are” 3/6/70 Robert Brown

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Robert Brown, the actor best known for starring on the ABC series Here Come the Brides, died Sept. 19 at 95 in Ojai, Calif. A New Jersey native, he was originally set to play the lead role of Det. Steve McGarrett on Hawaii Five-0 before being replaced by Jack Lord. Brown appeared in several films before he earned a guest-starring role on a 1967 Star Trek episode after John Drew Barrymore didn’t show up the morning of filming. He went on to star on Here Come the Brides, a Western that ran from 1968 to 1970; logged two appearances on Broadway; and appeared on Bewitched, Primus, and Columbo, among other TV show and film roles.

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Sacheen Littlefeather

Sacheen Littlefeather at the Oscars

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Sacheen Littlefeather, the activist who famously took the Oscars stage on Marlon Brando’s behalf to decline his award for The Godfather and protest the film industry’s treatment of Native American people, died Oct. 3 at 75, after battling breast cancer. Born Marie Louise Cruz in Salinas, Calif., to a white mother and an Apache and Yaqui Indian father, Littlefeather was a 26-year-old aspiring actress when she was escorted off the 1973 Oscars stage, as audience members booed. She was later given the chance to read the rest of her speech at a press conference and saw it printed in The New York Times. She was blacklisted following the Oscars ceremony and devoted her life to her activism work instead. In September, nearly 50 years after her speech, the Academy apologized to Littlefeather in person during a public presentation at the Academy Museum. Littlefeather’s life and activism were also the subject of a 2021 documentary, Sacheen: Breaking the Silence.

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Coolio

LOS ANGELES – MARCH 1995: Rapper Coolio poses for photos at the Soul Train Awards Sprite Night Party at the Sheraton Grand Hotel in Los Angeles, California in March 1995. (Photo By Raymond Boyd/Getty Images)

Credit: Raymond Boyd/Getty

Coolio, the rapper and actor behind such ’90s hits as the Grammy-winning “Gangsta’s Paradise” and “Fantastic Voyage,” died on Sept. 28 at 59.  His cause of death was not announced. Coolio first achieved success with his 1994 debut album It Takes a Thief, spawning the hit “Fantastic Voyage.” The following year he appeared on the soundtrack to the Michelle Pfeiffer film Dangerous Minds with “Gangsta’s Paradise.” One of the most successful rap songs of all time, it was the top song of 1995, spending three weeks at No. 1, and winning the 1996 Grammy for Best Rap solo performance. He recorded a total of eight studio albums and acted in a number of films and TV shows, including Batman & RobinMartinThe Nanny, and All That. Famously, Coolio also recorded the theme song to Kenan & Kel.

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Pharoah Sanders

UNSPECIFIED – CIRCA 1970: Photo of Pharoah Sanders Photo by Tom Copi/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Credit: Tom Copi/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty

Legendary jazz saxophonist Pharoah Sanders died in his Los Angeles home on Sept. 24 at age 81. The artist’s record label Luaka Bop confirmed the news on social media, describing Sanders as “always and forever the most beautiful human being.” Born Farrell Sanders in Little Rock, Ark., Sanders began playing tenor saxophone in high school and after graduating started playing in clubs in Oakland, Calif., and later in New York City. In 1965, he released his first album, Pharoah’s First, and also became a member of John Coltrane’s band, in which he performed until Coltrane’s death in 1967. He released more than 30 albums throughout his prolific career — including 1966’s Tauhid and 1969’s Karma — and also collaborated with artists like Alice Coltrane, Leon Thomas, and Norman Connors. His final album, 2021’s Promises, which he released with the British electronic producer Floating Points and the London Symphony Orchestra, was met with wide acclaim.

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John Hartman

Drummer John Hartman performing with American rock group The Doobie Brothers at the Rainbow Theatre, London, 31st January 1974. (Photo by Michael Putland/Getty Images)

Credit: Michael Putland/Getty

John Hartman, the original drummer of the historic rock group the Doobie Brothers, died at age 72, the band confirmed on social media. They described Hartman as a “wild spirit, great drummer, and showman” and “an intricate part of the band personality” in their statement. Born in Falls Church, Va., Hartman was one of the founding members of the Northern California rock outfit, which began performing in 1970, and was present for a string of their chart-topping hits, including “Listen to the Music,” “What A Fool Believes,” and “Takin’ It to the Streets.” Throughout the years, Hartman left and returned to the Doobie Brothers before officially announcing his retirement from the band in 1992. He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame alongside his bandmates in 2020.

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Louise Fletcher

American actress Louise Fletcher as Nurse Ratched in ‘One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest’, directed by Milos Forman, 1975. (Photo by Silver Screen Collection/Getty Images)

Credit: Silver Screen Collection/Getty

Louise Fletcher, the veteran actress who won an Oscar for her performance as the ruthless and menacing psychiatric ward administrator Nurse Ratched in the 1975 film One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, died peacefully in her home in France at the age of 88. Born in Birmingham, Ala., to deaf parents, Fletcher began her acting career appearing on television shows including LawmanBat MastersonMaverick, and The Untouchables in the 1950s. After taking a decade-long break to raise her two children, Fletcher returned to the silver screen as Mattie in Robert Altman‘s 1974 crime drama Thieves Like Us — a role that caught the attention of director Milos Forman, who later cast her as the villainous nurse in his adaptation of Ken Kesey’s hit 1962 novel. Her portrayal of the vicious health practitioner earned her an Oscar for Best Actress at the 1976 Academy Awards, during which she made waves by using American Sign Language to thank her parents in her acceptance speech, as well as a Golden Globe and an Emmy. Fletcher continued to star in various film and television projects throughout the next 40 years, appearing as the grandmother in the 1987 horror film Flowers in the Attic and Aunt Helen in 1999’s Cruel Intentions, and as Kai Winn on Star Trek: Deep Space Nine in the ’90s. Her final role was in the Netflix comedy series Girlboss in 2017.

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Cherry Valentine

Drag Race UK

Credit: World of Wonder

After wowing audiences across the pond on RuPaul’s Drag Race UK season 2, the former National Health Service nurse and drag superstar died on Sept. 18 at age 28. “[I’m] completely devastated and shook by the news about our friend Cherry. She was extremely kind, generous and talented,” remembered Cherry’s fellow season 2 competitor Tia Kofi.

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Henry Silva

Henry Silva

Credit: Everett Collection

Henry Silva, the veteran character actor known for playing the title role in Johnny Cool and starring alongside Frank Sinatra in The Manchurian Candidate and Ocean’s 11, died Sept. 14 at 95. A Brooklyn native, Silva frequently portrayed criminals, gangsters, and other bad guys, with credits including A Hatful of Rain, Buck Rogers in the 25th Century, Cannonball Run II, Dick Tracy, and Ghost Dog: Way of the Samurai. He also had a cameo in the 2001 remake of Ocean’s 11.

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Irene Papas

Irene Papas, 24 year old Greek beauty, established Italian movie star, in London.

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Irene Papas, a prolific Greek actress known for her roles in 1961’s The Guns of Navarone and 1964’s Zorba the Greek, died on Sept. 14, reports the Associated Press. She was 93. Born Irene Lelekoua, Papas was born in the southern Greek city of Corinth but left home at 18 to marry film director Alkis Papas, who she divorced in 1951. The passionate actress starred on both the stage and silver screen throughout her almost 6-decades-long career in entertainment. Papas landed her first role as Liana in Nikos Tsiforos’ film Fallen Angels in 1948 before going on to receive critical acclaim for her performances as Maria Pappadimos in The Guns of Navarone (1961), the Widow in Zorba the Greek (1964), and as Hélène in Z (1969). Throughout her career, Papas also portrayed the titular character of multiple Greek tragedies, including Antigone (1961) and Electra (1964). Her final role was in the 2004 film Ecuba, which she co-directed with Giuliana Berlinguer. 

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Mark Miller

Mark Miller

Credit: Everett Collection

Mark Miller, the actor and screenwriter known for starring on the TV series Please Don’t Eat the Daisies and Guestward Ho!, and for writing on beloved sitcoms like The Jeffersons and Diff’rent Strokes, died Sept. 9 at 97. Miller’s other onscreen credits included Days of Our Lives, I Spy, The Andy Griffith Show, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, The Patty Duke Show, and The Twilight Zone, and he co-wrote the 1995 film A Walk in the Clouds, starring Keanu Reeves.

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Jesse Powell

Singer Jesse Powell performs at Chess Records Studios in Chicago, Illinois in July 1998.

Credit: Raymond Boyd/Getty Images

Grammy-nominated singer-songwriter Jesse Powell died at the age of 51, his family announced Sept. 13 on social media. Born in Gary, Ind., Powell was raised in a musical family that included his two younger sisters, who became the popular late ’90s R&B duo Trina & Tamara. Powell himself became an overnight sensation in 1999 upon the release of his R&B hit “You.” The track cracked the second spot on the Billboard R&B Chart and peaked at No. 2 on the Billboard Hot 100 at the time. He went on to release four albums throughout his career: 1996’s Jesse Powell, 1998’s ‘Bout It (certified gold in 1999), 2001’s JP, and 2003’s Jesse.

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Jean-Luc Godard

Jean-Luc Godard

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Jean-Luc Godard, the pioneering filmmaker who helped lead French cinema into the New Wave movement with his 1960 work Breathless, died Sept. 13 at 91. French President Emmanuel Macron paid tribute to Godard as “the most iconoclastic of New Wave filmmakers,” while Swiss head of Home Affairs Alain Berset said his work “inspired generations of directors around the world.”

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PnB Rock

PnB Rock performs onstage at the STAPLES Center Concert Sponsored By Sprite during BET Experience at Staples Center on June 22, 2019 in Los Angeles, California.

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Rakim Hasheem Allen, better known by his stage name PnB Rock, was shot and killed in a Sept.12 robbery. He was 30. The Philadelphia native, who signed with Atlantic Records in 2015, rose to popularity with the release of his 2016 single “Selfish,” which peaked at 51 on the Billboard Hot 100. The artist dropped two albums throughout his career: 2017’s Catch These Vibes and 2019’s TrapStar Turnt PopStar. He’s also featured on multiple tracks with other prominent artists including Ed Sheeran, Chance the Rapper, Wiz Khalifa, Pop Smoke and more. 

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Jack Ging

HART TO HART – “What Murder?” – Airdate: November 18, 1980. JACK GING

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Jack Ging, a character actor known for his roles on TV classics such as The A-Team and Hawaii Five-O, died Sept. 9 at his home in California. He was 90. Ging began his career in the late 1950s and starred in over 50 TV shows and films throughout the ’90s. His work includes drama series Lassie (1954), western series Tales of Wells Fargo (1957), crime series Perry Mason (1957), and detective drama series Mannix (1967), among others. In film, he starred opposite Clint Eastwood in three films: Hang ‘Em High (1968), Play Misty for Me (1971), and High Plains Drifter (1973). Other movie credits include Desire in the Dust (1960), Sniper’s Ridge (1961), Intimacy (1966), and Where the Red Fern Grows (1974). Ging is survived by his wife and five children.

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Marsha Hunt

BEVERLY HILLS, CA – OCTOBER 27: Actress Marsha Hunt attends the premiere of “Trumbo” at Samuel Goldwyn Theater on October 27, 2015 in Beverly Hills, California. (Photo by Jason LaVeris/FilmMagic)

Credit: Jason LaVeris/FilmMagic

Marsha Hunt, an actress during Hollywood’s Golden Age whose career was disrupted by the McCarthy-era blacklist, died Sept. 7 at her home in Los Angeles. She was 104. Early in her career, Hunt starred in more than 50 films that varied in genre, including Pride and Prejudice (1940), Blossoms in the Dust (1941), Kid Glove Killer (1942), and Smash Up, the Story of a Woman (1947). Hunt’s career hit a roadblock when, in 1947, she traveled to Washington alongside Hollywood luminaries Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall to protest the House Un-American Activities Committee, which investigated communists in the film industry. The work dried up after her name was published in “Red Channels,” the infamous pamphlet featuring people in Hollywood believed to be communists or communist sympathizers. “I was never a communist or even interested in the communist cause,” she told the Associated Press in 1996. “I was a political innocent defending my industry.” Hunt turned her attention to lifelong activism following her blacklist, supporting the United Nations,  World Health Organization, and more.

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Queen Elizabeth II

Queen Elizabeth II

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Queen Elizabeth II, the monarch of the United Kingdom and 15 other Commonwealth realms, died on Sept. 8 at the age of 96. Her coronation took place on June 2, 1953, at Westminster Abbey and, for the first time ever, was televised, allowing people around the world to witness the event. The Queen’s 70-year reign was mostly peaceful, despite vast changes across her country, the evolution of the Commonwealth, and the rise of anti-monarchist sentiment in Britain over the decades. Queen Elizabeth II — who surpassed her great-great-grandmother, Queen Victoria, to become the longest-living British monarch on Dec. 21, 2007 — has been portrayed many times in pop culture. Helen Mirren is perhaps the most well-known actress to have played her in film, in 2006’s The Queen, for which she won an Academy Award. On television, both Claire Foy and Olivia Colman have portrayed the Queen on Netflix’s The Crown. Imelda Staunton is set to play her in the upcoming fifth season of the streaming giant’s regal drama.

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David A. Arnold

David A. Arnold

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David A. Arnold, the comedian, actor, writer, and showrunner who created the Nickelodeon series That Girl Lay Lay, died Sept. 7 at 54. A Cleveland native, Arnold was a stand-up veteran known for his hilarious takes on family life and marriage. He released two comedy specials, 2020’s Fat Ballerina and 2022’s It Ain’t For the Weak, the latter of which was produced by Kevin Hart. Arnold also wrote for and produced multiple TV series, including Netflix’s Fuller House, Nickelodeon’s Side Hustle, and BET ‘s Bigger. That Girl Lay Lay, which he created, wrote, and served as showrunner of, is a teen comedy about a girl who magically brings an avatar from an app to life.

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Peter Straub

Peter Straub

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Peter Straub, the acclaimed author of horror and supernatural fiction novels such as Julia, Ghost Story, The Talisman, and Black House, the latter two of which he penned with close friend Stephen King, died Sept. 4 at 79. Straub’s first two books, Marriages and Under Venus, had mixed success, and it wasn’t until 1975’s Julia that he turned to the paranormal. His first widespread success came with 1979’s Ghost Story, about four aging men haunted by something they did inadvertently in their youth. The book was adapted into a 1981 film starring Fred Astaire and Alice Krige. Straub and King published The Talisman in 1984 and a sequel, Black House, in 2001. Straub’s lengthy bibliography also included If You Could See Me Now, Shadowland, Floating Dragon, Koko, Mystery, The Throat, The Hellfire Club, and A Dark Matter.

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Charlbi Dean

Charlbi Dean Kriek

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Actress and model Charlbi Dean, best known for her roles in the DC superhero series Black Lightning and the Palme d’Or-winning film Triangle of Sadness, died Aug. 29 at the age of 32. The up-and-coming South African actress made her film debut in 2010’s Spud and later Spud 2, a comedy starring musician Troye Sivan as a first-year student attending an elite private boarding school in South Africa, at the cusp of apartheid’s collapse. She would then go on to star in Blood in the Water (2016), Don’t Sleep (2017), An Interview With God (2018), and Porthole (2018). On TV, she appeared in CBS’ Elementary and CW’s Black Lightning, portraying Syonide in the superhero drama. In her final film role, she starred in Ruben Östlund’s Triangle of Sadness, a satire about a group of wealthy passengers aboard a luxury cruise ship who find themselves trapped on an island after the mega-yacht sinks.

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Luke Bell

Musician Luke Bell performs onstage during 2016 Stagecoach California’s Country Music Festival at Empire Polo Club on April 30, 2016 in Indio, California.

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Country musician Luke Bell, known for hits “Where Ya Been?” and “Jealous Guy,” was found dead on Aug. 26, less than a week after he was reported missing. He was 32. Born in Lexington, Ky., Bell was raised in Cody, Wyo., and cut his teeth performing at a local bar while attending a nearby college. The country crooner went on to release two albums — Don’t Mind If I Do in 2014 and a self-titled record in 2016 —  and opened for fellow music icons Dwight Yoakam, Hank Williams Jr., and Willie Nelson throughout his career. 

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Joe E. Tata

Joe E. Tata

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Joe E. Tata, the actor best known for his role as the friendly Peach Pit diner owner Nat Bussichio on Beverly Hills, 90210, died Aug. 24 at 85. Fellow 90210 alum Ian Ziering paid tribute to his late costar as someone “as generous with his wisdom as he was with his kindness.” A Bronx native, Tata played Nat on Beverly Hills, 90210 for its entire run, from 1990 to 2000. He also reprised his role on the CW’s 90210 reboot. His other TV credits included the Adam West Batman series, Lost in Space, Mission: Impossible, Magnum P.I., and The Rockford Files.

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Virginia Patton Moss

Newly signed Warner Bros. starlet Virginia Patton, 1943

Credit: Courtesy Everett Collection

Virginia Patton Moss, a former actress best known for her role as Ruth Dakin Bailey in Frank Capra‘s It’s a Wonderful Life, died Aug. 18 at the age of 97. She made her film debut in the 1943 musical comedy Thank Your Lucky Stars before appearing in minor roles in Old Acquaintance (1943), Janie (1944), The Last Ride (1944), Hollywood Canteen (1944), The Horn Blows at Midnight (1945), and Canyon Passage (1946). Her role in It’s a Wonderful Life in 1946 led to starring roles in The Burning Cross (1947) and Black Eagle (1948). Her final film role came in 1949, in The Lucky Stiff, before she retired from Hollywood and married Cruse W. Moss, an automotive executive whom Patton Moss remained married to up until his death in 2018. In Ann Arbor, Mich., where she lived with her husband and family, Patton Moss worked as a docent at the University of Michigan Museum of Art and was involved in several local organizations. 

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Leon Vitali

WEST LOS ANGELES, CA – MAY 18: Actor Leon Vitali attends the premiere of Kino Lorber’s “Filmworker” at the Nuart Theatre on May 18, 2018 in West Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Amanda Edwards/Getty Images)

Credit: Amanda Edwards/Getty

Leon Vitali, a frequent Stanley Kubrick collaborator and his all-around man Friday, died Aug. 19 at age 74.

Vitali’s long partnership with Kubrick began with 1974’s Barry Lyndon, in which Vitali played the titular character’s stepson Lord Bullingdon. The experience left a profound impact on the young actor who all but gave up acting to devote his professional life to Kubrick.

For 1980’s The Shining, Vitali is credited as “personal assistant to the director,” though he did much more, including helping to cast the film’s young star Danny Lloyd. On 1987’s Full Metal Jacket and 1999’s Eyes Wide Shut, Vitali was credited as casting director and assistant to the director, also playing the character Red Cloak in the latter. 

After Kubrick’s death, Vitali oversaw restoration of most of his films, and in 2017 became the subject of his own film, Tony Zierra’s documentary Filmworker, which detailed Vitali’s contributions to Kubrick’s films and legacy. 

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Ioane “John” King

Ioane John King. Rhaskos. Spartacus. Starz

Credit: Starz

Ioane “John” King, who started as an extra on the Starz historical drama Spartacus before being promoted to recurring fan-favorite gladiator Rhaskos, died Aug. 15 from cancer. He was 49. The actor was diagnosed with adenocarcinoma cancer, which had spread in his pancreas and other organs in January. Along with Spartacus, which ran for three seasons between 2010 and 2013, King reprised his role in the related 2011 miniseries Spartacus: Gods of the Arena. His former costar Manu Bennett called him a “powerful presence” with an “ever positive attitude” in a tribute, remembering him fondly for his “huge grin and sparkle in his eye.”

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Robyn Griggs

Robyn Griggs

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Robyn Griggs, stage, film, and television actress primarily known for originating the role of Maggie Cory on Another World, died Aug. 13 from cervical cancer. She was 49. From 1986 to 1988 Griggs was one of the hosts of the Nickelodeon movie review show Rated K: For Kids by Kids. She then starred as Stephanie Hobart for six episodes of One Life to Live in 1991 through ’92, garnering a Young Artist Award nomination. The following year she originated the role of Maggie Cory on Another World, but she was unceremoniously fired two years later in 1995. She took a break from acting and returned in 2003. 

Griggs revealed her cancer diagnosis in 2020.

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Denise Dowse

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA – APRIL 19: Denise Dowse attends the 2022 Pan African Film and Arts Festival – Opening Night Gala Premiere of “Remember Me, The Mahalia Jackson Story” at Directors Guild Of America on April 19, 2022 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Maury Phillips/Getty Images)

Credit: Maury Phillips/Getty

Veteran TV actress Denise Dowse, best known for her roles as Vice Principal Yvonne Teasley on Beverly Hills, 90210 and therapist Rhonda Pine on Insecure, died Aug. 13 after she fell into a coma brought on by meningitis. She was 64. A fixture on ’90s TV, Dowse also appeared on Seinfeld, California Dreams, Full House, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, ER, and Moesha. Her most recent credits include Charmed, Secrets and Lies, Good Trouble, and Stumptown. Dowse’s prolific career also spanned film, including roles in Ray, Requiem for a Dream, Dr. Dolittle, Pleasantville, and Coach Carter. Prior to her death, Dowse was set to make her film directorial debut with Remember Me: The Mahalia Jackson Story.

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Wolfgang Petersen

Wolfgang Petersen

Credit: Everett Collection

Wolfgang Petersen, the Oscar-nominated German filmmaker who made a name for himself with the World War II drama Das Boot and went on to direct such Hollywood hits as Air Force OneThe Perfect Storm, and Troy, died Aug. 12 at 81. Born in Emden, Germany, Petersen began his directing career in the 1960s. His first feature film was 1974’s One or the Other of Us, but it was his third film, 1981’s Das Boot, that took his career to the next level. The critically acclaimed drama about life aboard a German U-boat earned six Academy Award nominations, including Best Director and Best Adapted Screenplay. Following the success of Das Boot, Petersen took his talents to Hollywood, carving out a space for himself helming starry action thrillers that boasted technically precise set pieces. Some of his most notable films included The NeverEnding Story, The Perfect Storm, Poseidon, Troy, Air Force One, Outbreak, and In the Line of Fire.

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Darius Campbell Danesh

Darius Campbell

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Darius Campbell Danesh, a singer and West End actor, died on Aug. 11 at age 41 after he was found unresponsive. Danesh made waves by singing Britney Spears‘ “Baby One More Time” as part of his audition for the U.K. talent show Popstars in 2001. A year later, the Scottish singer placed third on the U.K. talent show Pop Idol and his first single, titled “Colourblind,” topped the U.K. charts that July. He released two albums: 2002’s Dive In and 2004’s Live Twice. The actor appeared in multiple musical productions on London’s West End throughout his career, including Guys and DollsFunny Girl and Chicago alongside America Ferrera. He also originated the role of Billy Flynn in the theater adaptation of Gone With the Wind. Throughout his career, Danesh also produced multiple films. His recent credits include the 2019 horror film House Red and 2018 documentary Fountain of Youth.

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Anne Heche

Anne Heche

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Anne Heche, the actress who rose to prominence on the soap opera Another World and went on to star in such films as Six Days Seven Nights, Donnie BrascoWag the Dog, and My Friend Dahmer, has died at 53 after being involved in a fiery single-car crash in Los Angeles on Aug. 5. Born May 25, 1969, in Aurora, Ohio, Heche first made a name for herself portraying Vicky Hudson and Marley Love on Another World, for which she won a Daytime Emmy and two Soap Opera Digest Awards. Her prime-time television debut came in a 1991 episode of Murphy Brown, but it wasn’t until 1993 that she landed her first feature-film role, in Disney’s The Adventures of Huck Finn, opposite Elijah Wood. Other notable credits of hers include Ally McBealHungChicago P.D.QuanticoAll RiseDancing With the StarsThe VanishedPsycho, 13 Minutes, If These Walls Could Talk, Volcano, I Know What You Did Last Summer, and Return to Paradise

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Teddy Ray

LOS ANGELES, CA – JANUARY 08: Avyor Teddy Ray attends the ADD Comedy Live! Special Screening of “Ride Along” on January 8, 2014 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Rodrigo Vaz/FilmMagic)

Credit: Rodrigo Vaz/FilmMagic

Teddy Ray, an actor and comedian who was featured on MTV’s Messyness and HBO’s Pause With Sam Jay, died Aug. 12 at the age of 32. The rising comedic star, born Theadore Brown, appeared in a number of TV shows, shorts, and stand-up specials, including Comedians and Cocktails, How to Be Broke, BSU: Black Student Union, Colossal Clusterfest, and All Def Comedy, among others. He most recently served as cohost of the Ridiculousness spin-off Messyness alongside Nicole “Snooki” Polizzi, Tori Spelling, and Adam Rippon.

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Olivia Newton-John

Australian singer and actress Olivia Newton-John poses during a photo shoot at the Intercontinental Hotel on January 17, 2012 in Sydney, Australia.

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Olivia Newton-John, the English-Australian singer and actress known for her portrayal of good-girl-turned-greaser Sandy in 1978’s Grease, died Aug. 8 at 73. A singer first and foremost, she sold more than 100 million records over the course of her career, notching hits with tracks including “I Honestly Love You,” Grease‘s “Hopelessly Devoted to You,” and “Physical.” Facing multiple bouts with breast cancer over her lifetime, Newton-John was a fierce advocate in the fight against the disease, founding the Olivia Newton-John Cancer and Wellness Centre in Melbourne.

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Roger E. Mosley

HONOLULU – JANUARY 1: Pictured is Roger E. Mosley (asTheodore ‘TC’ Calvin) in the CBS television show, MAGNUM P.I. (Photo by CBS via Getty Images)

Credit: CBS via Getty

Roger E. Mosley, best known for his role as helicopter pilot Theodore “T.C.” Calvin on the ’80s hit show Magnum P.I., died Aug. 7. He was age 83.

Starting his acting career in 1971, Mosley had his most prominent film role in 1976 with Gordon Parks’ Leadbelly, based on the life of folk singer Huddie Ledbetter. That same year he appeared in Stay Hungry, featuring a young Arnold Schwarzenegger. Then in 1977, Mosley portrayed boxer Sonny Liston in the biographical sports film The Greatest, starring Muhammad Ali as himself.

Mosley continued acting in film and television throughout the ’70s and in 1980 he landed his most memorable role opposite Tom Selleck as the titular private investigator Thomas Magnum in the original Magnum P.I. From 1980 to 1988, Mosley played Theodore “T.C.” Calvin, the owner and sole employee of Island Hoppers, a local helicopter charter and tour van service, who always finds himself roped into Magnum’s cases.

In 2019, Mosley returned to the reboot of Magnum P.I., starring Jay Hernandez, playing Booky, “a Vietnam veteran and barber who offers sage advice and a great haircut.” Mosley reprised the role of Booky again in a 2021 episode, his final television appearance.

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Richard Roat

Richard Roat

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Richard Roat, a veteran actor known for his appearances on Friends and Seinfeld, died on Aug. 5 at the age of 89. The veteran actor made his debut on the 1962 sit-com Car 54, Where Are You? and went on to land over 135 roles throughout his 50-year-long career, including performances on Dallas, Dynasty, Hill Street Blues, Charlie’s Angels and The Golden Girls. His final role came in 2009 in the Fox drama 24. Off-screen, Roat worked as an entertainment tax preparer for over 50 years and, in his free time, was a whiskey connoisseur and avid supporter of the Los Angeles Angels and the Los Angeles Lakers. He is remembered in his obituary as having both a “gorgeous smile” and “a naughty twinkle in his eyes.”

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Judith Durham

Mandatory Credit: Photo by Joel Goodman/Lnp/Shutterstock (3785643h) The Seekers – Judith Durham The Seekers in concert at Bridgewater Hall, Manchester, Britain – 29 May 2014

Credit: Joel Goodman/Lnp/Shutterstock

Judith Durham, the Australian folk-music icon who sang lead on the Oscar-nominated single “Georgy Girl” with the Seekers, has died at the age of 79.

Durham died Friday at Alfred Hospital in Melbourne as a result of complications from a long-standing chronic lung disease, according to a statement from Musicoast Pty. Ltd. and Universal Music Australia.

Durham joined the Seekers in 1963, and the group soon rose to international fame with hits such as “I’ll Never Find Another You” and “The Carnival Is Over.” The track “Georgy Girl” was the title song for the 1966 Lynn Redgrave film of the same name.

In March 1967, the Seekers claimed a place in the Guinness Book of World Records for their performance at the Sidney Myer Music Bowl in Melbourne, which was attended by 200,000 people — roughly one-tenth of the city’s population at the time. The Seekers eventually sold 50 million records.

Durham left the group for a solo career in 1968 but returned to record with them throughout the 1990s. In 2015, Durham was named the Victorian of the Year, an honor given by Victoria, a Southeastern state in Australia. She was also awarded the Medal of the Order of Australia alongside her bandmates in 1995. The Seekers were jointly named Australian of the Year in 1967.

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Roseanna Christiansen

THE JEFFERSONS, Roseanna Christiansen, Marla Gibbs in episode ‘Florence Did it Different: Part 2’ aired 11/15/81 Season 8, 1975-85, (c)CBS/courtesy Everett Collection

Credit: Everett Collection

Roseanna Christiansen, who played the Ewings’ maid on 112 episodes of the prime-time soap opera Dallas, has died. She was 71.

Christiansen (left) died July 14 at the Antelope Valley Medical Center in Lancaster, Calif., according to The Hollywood Reporter. Her husband, Steve Rizzo, confirmed her death on his Facebook page.

Christiansen played the role of Teresa on David Jacobs’ CBS smash Dallas for nine seasons, from 1982 until the show’s conclusion in 1991. She also played a maid for three episodes of The Jeffersons in 1981 when Marla Gibbs’ character Florence left to star in the short-lived spin-off Checking In.

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Pat Carroll

Pat Carroll

Credit: Everett Collection

Pat Carroll, award-winning actress and comedian perhaps most memorably known as the voice of Ursula the sea witch in The Little Mermaid, died July 30 at the age of 95.

Carroll made her film debut in 1948’s Hometown Girl, then made her Broadway debut in 1955 in Catch a Star!, earning a Tony nomination for Best Featured Actress in a Musical. On TV, she won an Emmy in 1957 for the sketch comedy show Caesar’s Hour

In 1963, Carroll was cast as the voice of Jane Jetson in The Jetsons, but was replaced over sponsor conflicts with her show at the time, Make Room for Daddy

Carroll considered her 1989 performance as Ursula the sea witch in The Little Mermaid one of her favorite roles. 

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Nichelle Nichols

Nichelle Nichols as Lt. Nyota Uhura in the STAR TREK: THE ORIGINAL SERIES episode, “Arena.” Original air date January 19, 1967.

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Nichelle Nichols, who broke a major race barrier as the star of the 1960s sci-fi series Star Trek, died July 30 at age 89.

Nichols’ breakout role came when Roddenberry cast the actress as Lt. Nyota Uhura on the original Star Trek series. When the show first aired in 1966, Nichols was one of the first African-American women to play a major role on primetime television.

She is popularly cited as having the first interracial kiss on American television, when her character famously locked lips with white leading man William Shatner‘s Captain James T. Kirk.

Martin Luther King Jr. once called Nichols’ role “the first non-stereotypical role portrayed by a black woman in television history.”

Nichols enjoyed decades in the spotlight thanks to her screen work, her music career, and her activism to help more women succeed in the field of astronomy.

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Mary Alice

SUNSHINE STATE

Credit: Everett Collection

Emmy- and Tony Award-winning actress Mary Alice died on July 27. She was reportedly 85 years old, but her birth year has also been noted as both 1936 and 1941 by multiple sources.

Alice enjoyed a long career both onscreen and onstage, but is best known for her roles as Lettie Bostic on NBC’s Cosby Show spin-off A Different World, Effie Williams in the 1976 musical Sparkle, the Oracle in The Matrix Revolutions and video game Enter the Matrix, and Ellie Grant Hubbard on All My Children. She won the Emmy for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama in 1993 for her work as recurring character Marguerite Peck on I’ll Fly Away after having been nominated in the same category the year prior, and she won the Tony Award for Best Featured Actress in a Play in 1987 for her turn as Rose Maxson in the original Broadway production of August Wilson’s Pulitzer Prize-winning Fences.

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Paul Sorvino

GOODFELLAS, Paul Sorvino, 1990

Credit: Everett Collection

Paul Sorvino, the Tony-nominated actor best known for his role in Martin Scorsese’s 1990 film Goodfellas and for television’s Law & Order, died July 25 at the age of 83 from natural causes. Sorvino had suffered from various health issues over the previous few years, according to his publicist. His wife, Dee Dee Sorvino, was by his side at the time of passing. His daughter, actress Mira Sorvino, said her heart was “rent asunder” by his passing. 

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David Warner

David Warner poses during a photo call held on January 7, 2005 at his home in London, England.

Credit: Cambridge Jones/Getty Images

David Warner died at the age of 80 on July 24 after a battle with cancer. The prolific character actor, whose career spanned film, TV, stage, and voice work, was best known for his roles in films like TitanicThe Omen, and Tron. Warner’s most recent film appearance was as Admiral Boom in Mary Poppins Returns in 2018. 

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Bob Rafelson

LOS ANGLES, CA – 1990: Academy Award-nominated film director, Bob Rafelson, poses at an editing machine during a 1990 Los Angeles, California, photo portrait session. Actors Jack Nicholson and Karen Black both won Academy Awards starring in Rafelson’s 1970 film “Five Easy Pieces.” (Photo by George Rose/Getty Images)

Credit: George Rose/Getty

Bob Rafelson, a rebellious but culturally astute filmmaker best known for the Jack Nicholson classic Five Easy Pieces, died July 23 in Aspen, Colo. after a battle with lung cancer. He was 89.

In addition to his work as a filmmaker, Rafelson also co-created, with production partner Bert Schneider, the 1960s TV pop group The Monkees.

In 1969, BBS Productions — Rafelson’s company with Schneider and Steve Blauner — produced the cultural phenomenon Easy Rider. The final nail in the coffin of the old Hollywood studio system, the film brought Nicholson the first of 12 Oscar nominations. 

Rafelson then directed Five Easy Pieces in 1970, a critical smash that earned the auteur two Oscar nominations, Best Picture and Best Screenplay, which he shared with Carole Eastman. The following year he also produced Peter Bogdanovich‘s The Last Picture Show.

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Melanie Rauscher

Melanie Rauscher naked and afraid Discovery Channel

Credit: Discovery Channel

Melanie Rauscher, a contestant on season 7 of Discovery Channel’s Naked and Afraid and the spin-off series Naked and Afraid XL, died July 17 in Prescott, Ariz. She was 35. Rauscher’s family remembered her as “avid outdoor enthusiast,” “diehard Eagles fan,” and “natural comedian.” Rauscher’s former castmate Jeremy McCaa paid tribute to her on Facebook, calling her his “swamp wife” and best friend. “We had such a chemistry on the show and it blossomed into a friendship that goes beyond words could describe,” McCaa wrote. “Her laughter was one of a kind. Her friendship was amazing. Even tho we wasn’t blood, we was family. I could always count on her. We had so many moments when we would just be there for each other.”

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Taurean Blacque

HILL STREET BLUES — Season 6 — Pictured: Taurean Blacque as Det. Neal Washington — (Photo by: Gary Null/NBCU Photo Bank/NBCUniversal via Getty Images via Getty Images)

Credit: Gary Null/NBCU Photo Bank/Getty

Taurean Blacque, best known for his role as Det. Neal Washington on Hill Street Blues, died July 21 at age 82 following a brief illness.

Blacque got his breakthrough role in 1981 with the groundbreaking police drama Hill Street Blues, co-created by Steven Bochco. Blacque played streetwise Det. Neal Washington for 144 episodes during the show’s entire run, earning a Best Supporting Actor Emmy nomination in 1982. 

A staunch advocate for adoption, Blacque had two biological sons and adopted 11 children, becoming the spokesman for the county of Los Angeles Adoption Service. In 1989, President George H.W. Bush asked Blacque to be the national spokesman for adoption.

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Shonka Dukureh

Shonka Dukureh as Big Mama Thornton in ‘Elvis’

Credit: Kane Skennar/Warner Bros.

Shonka Dukureh died age 44 on July 21. The singer and actress was best known for playing Big Mama Thornton in Baz Luhrmann’s film, Elvis. Hailing from Nashville, Tennessee by way of North Carolina, Dukureh originally wanted to be a teacher before pursuing a career in the performing arts. In addition to Elvis, which was her big screen debut, Dukureh also performed with or recorded background vocals with the likes of Jamie Lidell and the Royal Pharaohs, Nick Cave, Mike Farris, Pete Rock, Smoke Dza and Bahamas, and many more.

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Q Lazzarus

Q Lazarrus

Credit: TRISTAR PICTURES

Q Lazzarus, the singer behind the cult-favorite 1988 single “Goodbye Horses,” which was featured in The Silence of the Lambs, died July 19 at 61. Born Diane Luckey before adapting her stage name, Lazzarus’ songs were prominently featured in director Jonathan Demme‘s films, including “The Candle Goes Away” (from 1986’s Something Wild), her cover of the Talking Heads song “Heaven” (from 1993’s Philadelphia), and the iconic “Goodbye Horses,” which appeared in a memorable scene from 1991’s The Silence of the Lambs in which serial killer Buffalo Bill is applying makeup and flirting with himself in the mirror. The singer remained largely under the radar for much of the past two decades, but, according to her close friend and filmmaker Eva Aridjis, had spent the last three years collaborating on a documentary about her life and music, out 2023. 

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Rebecca Balding

Rebecca Balding

Credit: Jim Britt /American Broadcasting Companies via Getty Images

Rebecca Balding, a veteran character actress best known for her roles on Soap and Charmed, died July 18 at age 73 following a battle with ovarian cancer. 

From 1978 to 1980, Balding had one of her most memorable roles on Soap, created by The Golden Girls‘ Susan Harris, playing Carol David, an attorney who has an affair — and a child — with Billy Crystal’s groundbreaking gay character Jodie Dallas.

Balding’s last TV role was as Alyssa Milano’s boss, newspaper editor-in-chief Elise Rothman, on Charmed from 2002 to 2006.

The actress’ extensive credits include Lou GrantBarnaby Jones, Starsky and Hutch, Cagney & LaceyFamily Ties, Designing WomenE.R., and 7th Heaven, among many others.

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Nolan Neal

THE VOICE

Credit: Tyler Golden/NBCU Photo Bank/NBCUniversal via Getty Images

Nolan Neal, a contestant on both America’s Got Talent and The Voice, died July 18 in Nashville. He was 41. The southern rock singer appeared on season 11 of The Voice in 2016, where he competed on Team Adam Levine before his elimination in the Knockout round. In 2020, Neal appeared on season 15 of AGT, making it to the  Quarterfinals in the Judges’ Choice before his elimination. Neal has released two albums, 2013’s The Wire and 2018’s NashviLA.

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Mickey Rooney Jr.

Mickey Rooney Jr.

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Mickey Rooney Jr., an original Mouseketeer, actor, and musician who was the eldest child of screen legend Mickey Rooney, died July 16 at his home in Glendale, Az. He was 77. Born Joseph Yule III in Birmingham, Ala., to his famous father and Betty Jane Baker, a former Miss Birmingham, Rooney landed a job on The Mickey Mouse Club with his brother Tim in 1955, but they only worked on the show for a short time before being fired. Rooney went on to make a name for himself through his music career. He played guitar, keyboard, bass, drums, and harmonica, and performed in bands with Willie Nelson. He also logged appearances with Nelson in the films Honeysuckle Rose and Songwriter.

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William Hart

William Hart

Credit: Don Paulsen/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

William Hart, the lead singer and songwriter for the soul group the Delfonics, died July 14 at 77. The group was best known for their 1960s and ’70s classics, such as the Billboard top 10 hits “La – La – Means I Love You” and “Didn’t I (Blow Your Mind This Time),” the latter of which won the Grammy for Best R&B Vocal Performance by a Duo or Group. The Delfonics were re-introduced to a whole new generation of music lovers in the mid-’90s, when the Fugees reimagined the hook from their 1968 song “Ready or Not Here I Come (Can’t Hide From Love)” for their own 1996 hit “Ready or Not,” and Missy Elliott sampled the song’s intro for her track “Sock It 2 Me” in 1997. Quentin Tarantino also paid homage to the Delfonics in his 1997 film Jackie Brown.

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Monty Norman

Monty Norman

Credit: PA Images / Alamy Stock Photo

The composer, best known for writing the “James Bond Theme,” died July 11 at the age of 94. Born in London, Norman began his career as a singer before starting to write tunes for stage musicals, including Expresso Bongo, which was turned into a 1959 film, and Belle or the Ballad of Dr Crippen. Bond producer Cubby Broccoli was impressed by Norman’s work on the latter and asked him to compose the score for the inaugural film in the Bond franchise, 1962’s Dr. No. Part of that commission, the “James Bond Theme,” would become among the most instantly recognizable pieces of music in Hollywood history. “Quite often these days people come up to me and say, ‘Oh, you’re the man who wrote dum-diddy-dum-dum,'” Norman later said. “They don’t even sing the melody! But everyone seems to know what they mean!”

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L.Q. Jones

BEVERLY HILLS, CA – AUGUST 12: Actor L.Q. Jones attends the Golden Boot Awards held at the Beverly Hilton Hotel on August 12, 2006 in Beverly Hills, California. (Photo by Frazer Harrison/Getty Images)

Credit: Frazer Harrison/Getty

L.Q. Jones, a veteran character actor whose career spanned seven decades in film and TV, died July 9 of natural causes at his home in the Hollywood Hills. He was 94. Born Justice Ellis McQueen, Jones took his stage name from his first film role in Raoul Walsh’s 1955 war action, Battle Cry. His credits include An Annapolis Story, Toward the Unknown, Gunsmoke, The Virginian, and Wagon Train. The western staple was also a regular in Sam Peckinpah films, such as The Wild Bunch, Ride the High Country, Major Dundee, The Battle of Cable Hogue, and Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid. Jones’ career also extended into writing, producing, and directing, beginning with his 1975 feature A Boy and His Dog. His most recent credits include The Mask of Zorro, The Patriot, and Casino.

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Lenny Von Dohlen

Twin Peaks

Credit: Showtime

The actor, best known as doomed shut-in Harold Smith on the original Twin Peaks, died July 5 at the age of 63. Dohlen played a pivotal role in the mystery of Laura Palmer’s death in the series, also appearing in the film Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me. His other projects included parts in the movies Home Alone 3Tender Mercies, Tollbooth, Cadillac, and One Good Turn. On the small screen, he starred in Miami ViceThe Equalizer, Psych, and, most recently, The Orville

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Larry Storch

Larry Storch

Credit: Everett Collection

The actor, Emmy-nominated for his portrayal of the bumbling Corporal Randolph Agarn on the 1960s sitcom F Troop, died July 8 at the age of 99. Storch began his career as a comic, channeling his knack for humor into a slew of guest appearances on television before landing his most memorable role on F Troop. He also worked on Broadway and in 25 feature films, including seven with Tony Curtis, who was his shipmate during their time in the United States Navy during World War II.

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James Caan

James Caan

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James Caan, the star of beloved films such as The Godfather, Misery, and Elm, died on July 6 at 82. The actor was best known for playing Sonny Corleone in Francis Ford Coppola’s 1972 masterpiece, for which he was nominated for Best Supporting Actor at the Oscars. Caan also made an impression in Michael Mann’s Thief and Wes Anderson’s Bottle Rocket, among many other classic roles. He was the father of five children, including Hawaii Five-0 star Scott Caan

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Joel Turkel

joe turkel

Credit: Warner Brothers

Joe Turkel, a prolific character actor known for his turns in The Shining and Blade Runner, died on June 27 at St. John’s Hospital in Santa Monica. He was 94.

Out of his 100-plus film and TV credits, Turkel is perhaps best known for his role as Lloyd, the preternaturally calm bartender in Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining. Two years later, in 1982, Ridley Scott cast him as Eldon Tyrell, the creator of the replicants, in Blade Runner.

With his lean face and hollow cheeks, Turkel was a frequent presence on screens big and small beginning in 1949 with City Across the River, a crime noir about a Brooklyn street gang, until his final credited appearance in 1990’s outer-space thriller The Dark Side of the Moon, which was set on a satellite maintenance ship in 2022.

Between those years, Turkel made appearance on shows including Miami Vice, The Andy Griffith Show, Fantasy Island, S.W.A.T., Bonanza, The Lone Ranger, and The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin.

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Mary Mara

Mary Mara

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Mary Mara, the actress known for her work on such TV series as ER, Law & Order, and Nash Bridges, was found dead June 27 in an apparent drowning. She was 61. Mara’s first screen role came in the 1989 TV movie The Preppie Murder, and her first big break was in the 1992 film Love Potion No. 9, opposite Sandra Bullock. She was perhaps best known for playing Loretta Sweet, a sympathetic, down-and-out sex worker and single mother, on the medical drama ER. Mara also portrayed Police Inspector Bryn Carson on Nash Bridges and appeared on Monk, NYPD Blue, Aly McBeal, Ray Donovan, Dexter, and Shameless. Her final role was in the 2020 film Break Even, and she retired shortly after that.

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Jim Seals

Jim Seals

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Jim Seals, half of 1970s soft rock duo Seals and Crofts, died June 7 at the age of 80. Seals and musical partner Darrell “Dash” Crofts first joined rock band the Champs, already known for their 1958 hit “Tequila,” alongside Glen Campbell before forming Seals and Crofts in the late ’60s. The duo had three Top 10 hits: “Summer Breeze,” “Diamond Girl,” and “Get Closer,” all of which reached No. 6 on the Billboard Hot 100. Other popular songs include “Hummingbird,” “We May Never Pass This Way,” and “You’re the Love.” The duo disbanded in 1980 but reunited briefly in 1991 and again in 2004, releasing their final album Traces. In the intervening years, Seals continued to play music and tour with his late brother, Dan Seals, as Seals & Seals. He is survived by his wife Ruby and their three children, Joshua, Sutherland, and Juliet.

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Alec John Such

alec john such

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A founding member of Bon Jovi, Alec John Such died at age 70, the band announced on June 5. They did not disclose his cause of death. The original bassist for the Grammy-winning band, Jon Bon Jovi and David Bryan recruited Such to form Bon Jovi in 1983. Such played on some of the band’s most popular songs including “Livin’ on a Prayer,” “Wanted Dead or Alive,” and “You Give Love a Bad Name.” The bassist quit the band in 1994 but reunited with the rest of Bon Jovi in 2018 for its induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. 

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Paul Vance

EARJK5 Nov. 19, 2014 – Florida, U.S. – Paul Vance in Delray Beach Wednesday, November 19, 2014. (Credit Image: © Bruce R. Bennett/The Palm Beach Post/ZUMA Wire)

Credit: Bruce R. Bennett/The Palm Beach Post/ZUMA Wire

Paul Vance, the songwriter behind “Itsy Bisty Teenie Weenie Yellow Polka Dot Bikini” and hundreds of other songs, died May 30 at the age of 92. His cause of death was not disclosed. Born Joseph Paul Florio on Nov. 4, 1929, Vance also wrote “Catch a Falling Star” and “Tracy,” and his music was performed by artists including Frank Sinatra, Shirley Bassey, and Robert Goulet. Brian Hyland’s version of “Itsy Bisty Teenie Weenie Yellow Polka Dot Bikini” became a global hit in 1960, spending 13 weeks on the Billboard top 40, including one week in the No. 1 spot.

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Brad Johnson

Brad Johnson

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Brad Johnson, best known for starring in Steven Spielberg‘s romantic drama Always and for his turn on the Fox series Melrose Place, died Feb. 18 in Fort Worth, Tex. He was 62. Johnson began his career on the professional rodeo circuit in 1984, where he was discovered by a casting director, which led to his stint as the Marlboro Man in the 1980s. In 1989, Johnson scored the part of Ted Baker in Always, starring opposite Holly Hunter and Richard Dreyfuss. In 1996, Johnson snagged a recurring role as pediatrician Dominick O’Malley in the soap opera Melrose Place.

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Ronnie Hawkins

Ronnie Hawkins

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The musician and mentor to the Band died May 29 at the age of 87. Hawkins, known for his rockabilly sound, achieved fame with his band the Hawks, which had a rotating crop of talent, but at one point featured Levon Helm, Richard Manuel, Garth Hudson, Rick Danko, and Robbie Robertson, all of whom went on to form the Band. He featured prominently in 1978’s The Last Waltz, Martin Scorsese’s documentary about the Band’s 1976 farewell concert; Hawkins performed as a guest at the concert. His last album was 2002’s Still Cruisin’. 

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George Shapiro

George Shapiro at the Hollywood Improv on March 5, 2008 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Michael Schwartz/WireImage)

Credit: Michael Schwartz/WireImage

George Shapiro, a renowned talent manager and producer who represented comedy stars Jerry Seinfeld, uncle Carl Reiner, and Andy Kaufman, among others, died May 26 of natural causes. He was 91. A co-founder of entertainment firm Shapiro/West & Associates, Shapiro executive produced a number of TV shows, specials, and documentaries, including Seinfeld, and helped assemble talent for shows such as The Steve Allen Show, That Girl, and specials headlined by Dick Van Dike, Mary Tyler Moore, and Carol Channing. Shapiro was also the subject of the 2019 documentary The Bronx, USA, which followed the manager and producer as he returned to his hometown and revisited memories from his youth.

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Bo Hopkins

HOLLYWOOD, CA – APRIL 10: Bo Hopkins attends the 2014 TCM Classic Film Festival’s opening night gala and world premiere of the restoration of “Oklahoma!” hosted at the TCL Chinese Theatre IMAX on April 10, 2014 in Hollywood, California. (Photo by Jennifer Lourie/FilmMagic)

Credit: Jennifer Lourie/FilmMagic

Veteran actor Bo Hopkins, who starred in more than 100 TV shows and movies, including The Wild Bunch and American Graffiti, died May 28 after he suffered a heart attack earlier this month. He was 84. Hopkins landed his first film role in the 1969 western drama The Wild Bunch, 1972’s The Getaway, 1975’s The Killer Elite, 1973’s American Graffiti, 1976’s A Small Town in Texas, 1989’s The Bounty Hunter, and most recently, 2020’s Hillbilly Elegy. Hopkins also starred in a number of TV shows during the 1970s and ’80s, including Dynasty, Charlie’s Angels, Fantasy Island, Hotel, The A-Team, and Murder, She Wrote.

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Ray Liotta

Ray Liotta

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Ray Liotta, star of Goodfellas and other beloved films, died May 26 in his sleep while filming a movie in the Dominican Republic. He was 67. Liotta made his film debut in 1983’s The Lonely Lady, but got his breakthrough role in 1986’s Something Wild, which garnered him a Golden Globe nomination. He memorably portrayed the ghost of Shoeless Joe Jackson in 1989’s Field of Dreams before taking on his most iconic role as Henry Hill, the protagonist of Martin Scorsese’s 1990 Goodfellas. Other film credits include Cop Land, Killing Them Softly, The Place Beyond the Pines, and Marriage Story, while TV credits include Smith, Shades of Blue, and ER, for which he won a Primetime Emmy.

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Andy Fletcher

Andy Fletcher

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Andy Fletcher, a keyboardist and founding member of the English electronic band Depeche Mode, died in late May at 60. Fletcher played on all of the group’s studio albums since its inception. In that time, Depeche Mode were been nominated for five Grammys and sold more than 100 million records worldwide, with a whopping 54 songs charting on the U.K. singles shart and 17 top-10 albums in the U.K. The band and its members were also inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2020.

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Lee Lawson

Lee Lawson as Bea Reardon on Guiding Light

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Lee Lawson, a veteran actress perhaps best known for portraying tbe no-nonsense mother, Bea Reardon, of seven on the popular soap Guiding Light, died May 22 after a battle with cancer and COVID-19.  She was 80.  Before joining the drama, Lawson played Barbara Sterling on the CBS soap Love of Life in 1965, splitting her time between the stage and television. She made her Broadway debut in the comedy Cactus Flower opposite Lauren Bacall. From 1981-90, Lawson appeared in 52 episodes of Guiding Light — the second longest running drama in TV history — as Springfield’s own Bea Reardon, owner of the Seventh Street Boarding House. Lawson also appeared on Maude, Kojak, and One Life to Live.

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Vangelis

Greek composer and keyboard player Vangelis poses at his apartment in Paris, 9th June 1991.

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Vangelis, the prolific electronic musician and Oscar-winning film composer, died on May 17 in Paris, France from heart failure. He was 79. After winning the Academy Award for Best Original Film Score for 1981’s Chariots of Fire (a soundtrack that became a global sensation and has since been used in Olympic ceremonies and other real-life sporting events), Vangelis went on to score other impactful films like Ridley Scott’s sci-fi classic Blade Runner and Costa-Gavras’ Palme d’Or winner Missing. To this day, his signature synthesizer sound remains emblematic of ’80s film. 

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Marnie Schulenburg

Marnie Schulenburg

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Marnie Schulenburg, the Daytime Emmy-nominated actress known for her work on TV series including As the World Turns and One Life to Live, died May 17 in Bloomington, N.J., from metastatic breast cancer. She was 37. Schulenburg was the final and longest-tenured actress to play Alison McDermott Stewart on As the World Turns — a role originated in 1994 — and her performance earned her a Daytime Emmy nomination in 2010 for Outstanding Younger Actress in a Drama Series. Her other TV credits included The Good Fight, Blue Bloods, Elementary, Royal Pains, and City on a Hill.

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John Aylward

John Aylward on ‘ER’

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John Aylward, the veteran stage and screen actor known for his work on ER, The West Wing, and more, died May 16 at 75. A native of Seattle, Aylward got his start in the local theater scene and was a founding member of the Empty Space Theatre in the early ’70s. His first small-screen role was in the 1976 TV movie The Secret Life of John Chapman. Aylward was perhaps best known for playing Dr. Donald Anspaugh on ER and former DNC chairman Barry Goodwin on The West Wing. His countless other TV credits also included 3rd Rock From the Sun, Northern Exposure, Alias, Mad Men, American Horror Story, Yellowstone, Shameless, and Briarpatch. Beyond TV, Aylward appeared in such films as Instinct, A Million Ways to Die in the West, The Way Back, and Water for Elephants and such theater productions as Death of a Salesman, Richard III, The Kentucky Cycle, and City of Conversation.

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Lil Keed

ATLANTA, GEORGIA – JULY 17: Rapper Lil Keed performs onstage during Hot 107.9 Birthday Bash 25 at Center Parc Credit Union Stadium at Georgia State University on July 17, 2021 in Atlanta, Georgia. (Photo by Paras Griffin/Getty Images)

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Lil Keed, a young rising rapper from Atlanta, died on March 13. He was 24. A mentee of fellow Atlanta native Young Thug, Lil Keed first made it to the Billboard rap chart with “Nameless,” and went on to collaborate with artists like 21 Savage, Offset, and Lil Yachty.

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Fred Ward

Fred Ward

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Fred Ward, the longtime character actor known for appearing in a diverse spectrum of films, died May 8. He was 79. His family declined to release a cause of death. Ward starred in such films as the horror-comedy-western Tremors, the neo noir black comedy Miami Blues, and the historical drama The Right Stuff, among others. His last screen appearance was in season 2 of True Detective, and he spent his remaining years developing his skills at painting, according to those close to him.  

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Bruce MacVittie

Bruce MacVittie

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Bruce MacVittie, a veteran of the stage who was also known for roles in television including in The Sopranos and the Law & Order franchise, died May 7 at the age of 65. He made his Broadway debut in 1983 opposite Al Pacino in a production of David Mamet’s American Buffalo, a role which he would go on to perform on a national tour and in the West End of London. In addition to his work on and off Broadway, MacVittie had a long tenure playing guest-starring roles in television and film, starting with a role on Barney Miller. From there, he had roles on Miami Vice, The Equalizer, Spenser: For Hire, The Street, L.A. Law, The Stand, Homicide: Life on the Street and Oz. In 2002, he would take on the role of Danny Scalercio in The Sopranos. He also had many roles across the Law & Order franchise, starting in 1991.

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Mickey Gilley

Singer Mickey Gilley performs onstage during day 2 of the Stagecoach Music Festival at The Empire Polo Club on April 25, 2015 in Indio, California.

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Mickey Gilley, the country singer whose famous honky-tonk inspired the 1980 film Urban Cowboy, died May 7 in Branson, Missouri. He was 86. Gilley began his career in the 1950s with his first recorded single “Ooh Wee Baby” and over time, went on to amass 17 No. 1 country records. He was most notable for owning a country music nightclub (named “Gilley’s”) which opened in the early 1970s in Pasadena, Texas. The honky-tonk put Texas cowboy culture on the map, eventually serving as the real-life inspiration and setting for Urban Cowboy starring John Travolta

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Kang Soo-youn

Mandatory Credit: Photo by YONHAP/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock (12549566b) South Korean actress Kang Soo-youn poses for a photo at the opening ceremony of the 3rd Gangneung International Film Festival (GIFF) at Gangneung Art Center in Gangneung, 240 kilometers east of Seoul, South Korea, 22 October 2021. GIFF will run through 31 October, showing 116 films from 42 countries. 3rd Gangneung International Film Festival, Korea – 22 Oct 2021

Credit: YONHAP/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock

Kang Soo-youn, the first South Korean actor to win a Venice International Film Festival award, died May 7 at the age of 55, The Korea Herald reports. Born in 1966, Kang began acting at the age of 4, and she appeared in a series of popular films in the 1980s and 1990s that launched her into international acclaim. Her turn in 1987’s The Surrogate Womb won her the Best Actress prize at the Venice International Film Festival. In 1989, she worked with Womb director Im Kwon-taek again in Come, Come, Come Upward, which earned her the Moscow International Film Festival’s Best Actress honor. Her final film, Jung_E, a dystopian South Korean sci-fi flick directed by Train to Busan helmer Yeon Sang-ho, will debut on Netflix later this year.

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George Perez

HOLLYWOOD, CA – JANUARY 30: George Perez arrives at Excelsior! A Celebration Of The Amazing, Fantastic, Incredible And Uncanny Life Of Stan Lee at TCL Chinese Theatre on January 30, 2019 in Hollywood, California. (Photo by Gregg DeGuire/Getty Images)

Credit: Gregg DeGuire/Getty

Comic book legend George Pérez died May 6, five months after publicly announcing his diagnosis of terminal pancreatic cancer. He was 67 years old. The artist and writer redefined the Teen Titans, created the first great superhero crossover event, and influenced countless other artists. Born June 9, 1954, in the South Bronx, New York City, Pérez started drawing at an early age. His comic book career kicked off in the ’70s, his breakthrough arriving when he began drawing Marvel’s Avengers series. Decades before the Marvel Cinematic Universe, Pérez made characters like Captain America and Scarlet Witch cool for readers.

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Mike Hagerty

SOMEBODY SOMEWHERE, Mike Hagerty

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Mike Hagerty, the character actor best known for his recurring role as Mr. Treeger on Friends, died May 5. He was 67. Born in Chicago, Hagerty had a long career of memorable roles in the industry, including as a series regular on two short-lived sitcoms: The George Carlin Show and Lucky Louie. He also appeared in the original The Wonder Years and in episodes of Boston Legal, Brooklyn Nine-Nine, Cheers, Community, CSI, Curb Your Enthusiasm, Entourage, ER, Ghost Whisperer, Glee, The Goldbergs, Grey’s Anatomy, Happy Endings, Medium, The Mindy Project, Mob City, Monk, Seinfeld, Shameless, and The Wayans Bros. Hagerty’s breakout performance, which would make him memorable in pop culture for years to come, was in the hit NBC sitcom Friends. His most recent role was starring opposite Bridget Everett as her character Sam’s father, farmer Ed Miller, in the HBO comedy series Somebody, Somewhere

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Kenneth Welsh

TORONTO, ON – SEPTEMBER 11: Actor Kenneth Welsh attends the Virgin Mobile Arts & Cinema Centre – “The Art Of The Steal” After Party at F-Stop on September 11, 2013 in Toronto, Canada. (Photo by J. Countess/Getty Images)

Credit: J. Countess/Getty

Kenneth Welsh, the prolific Canadian actor best known for his role as Twin Peaks villain Windom Earle, died May 5. Welsh had more than 200 film and television credits, including appearances in everything from Hollywood blockbusters like Legends of the Fall and The Day After Tomorrow to Hallmark holiday fare like A Nutcracker Christmas. He guest-starred on dozens of Canadian and American television shows, including The X-Files, Due South, The Expanse, Human Target, Being Erica, and Smallville. However, the actor is likely best remembered for his turn as Twin Peaks‘ sinister chess obsessive, who ties his murders to a correspondence chess game he plays with Agent Dale Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan).

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Kailia Posey

Kailia Posey

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Kailia Posey, who garnered fame as a young child on TLC’s reality show Toddlers & Tiaras died May 2nd from suicide. She was 16. Posey appeared on the TLC reality show Toddlers & Tiaras, which followed families as they prepared their children to compete in beauty pageants, multiple times from 2011-2012. She starred in multiple episodes from 2011-2012, and almost instantly became a standout thanks to her natural talent. She would later become even more famous for something that will live on the internet forever: an expression that, over the years, has become immortalized as a popular reaction GIF on social media.

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Naomi Judd

Naomi Judd in 2018

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Naomi Judd, the singer known for her Grammy-winning work as half of country music duo the Judds, and the mother of Ashley and Wynonna Judd, died April 30 at age 76. “Today we sisters experienced a tragedy. We lost our beautiful mother to the disease of mental illness,” her daughters said in a statement to the Associated Press. “We are shattered. We are navigating profound grief and know that as we loved her, she was loved by her public. We are in unknown territory.” Judd rose to fame as half of a singing duo with her daughter Wynonna, scoring 14 number-one hits on the country music charts between 1983 and 1991. The duo reunited at the 2022 CMT Music Awards for their first TV performance in 20 years, and were slated to begin a final reunion tour this September.

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David Birney

American actor David Birney during the filming of the made-for-television movie Le Complot du Renard.

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David Birney, the television, film, and stage star best known for his role as Bernie Steinberg in the short-lived sitcom Bridget Loves Bernie, died April 29 in Santa Monica after a five-year battle with Alzheimer’s. He was 83. Birney’s Broadway debut came in 1969 when he performed in Molière’s The Miser. He went on to star in numerous stage productions, including The Playboy of the Western World and Amadeus on Broadway, as well as Much Ado About Nothing, Hamlet, and A Moon for the Misbegotten in regional theater. In 1972, he found fame in television as the husband of Meredith Baxter (who would go on to be his future real-life wife) in the CBS sitcom Bridget Loves Bernie. While the show itself was short-lived due to controversial protests about the couple’s interfaith marriage, Birney went on to have a successful career on the small screen, earning acclaim for his role in the first season of the medical dramedy St. Elsewhere. His last known television role was in 2007, when he guested on the police procedural Without A Trace.

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Joanna Barnes

Joanna Barnes

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Joanna Barnes, the actress and writer best known for her roles in The Parent Trap and Auntie Mame, died April 29. She was 87. Barnes began her career in Hollywood in the late 1950s and appeared in dozens of television shows, including  The Trials of O’Brien, Beverly Hillbillies, Fantasy Island, Hart to Hart, Benson, and Charlie’s Angels, among others. She also hosted Dateline: Hollywood, interviewing stars and taking viewers into the world of Tinseltown, and served as a panelist on the CBS game show What’s My Line? Barnes’ film credits include Tarzan, the Ape Man, Violent Road, The Purple Hills, Too Many Thieves, and, of course, Auntie Mame, which earned her a Golden Globe nomination, and both Parent Traps: Barnes starred in the 1961 version starring Hayley Mills as Vicky Robinson, the gold digger out to wed the twins’ father (Brian Keith), and later, in the 1998 version starring Lindsay Lohan as Vicki Blake, the mother of her original character, played by Elaine Hendrix

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Jossara Jinaro

LOS ANGELES, CA – NOVEMBER 03: Actress Jossara Jinaro attends Richard Lawson and Tina Knowles Lawson Launch at the WACO Theater Grand Opening at WACO Theater Center on November 3, 2017 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Greg Doherty/Getty Images)

Credit: Greg Doherty/Getty Images

Jossara Jinaro, an actress who appeared on such TV shows as ERThe Young and the Restless, and Judging Amy, died April 27 following a battle with cancer. She was 48. Jinaro’s husband announced her death on her Facebook page, writing, “Jossara was an amazing wife, mother, artist, and friend. She had the most beautiful, kind soul and wouldn’t take no for an answer. Even in her last moments, she was still fighting.”

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Neal Adams

Neal Adams

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Neal Adams, the influential comic book artist and creators’ rights advocate, died on April 28, his family confirmed. He was 80 years old. Adams left an imprint on iconic superheroes like Batman and Green Arrow, co-created new characters like Ra’s al Ghul and Green Lantern John Stewart, and advocated for creators’ rights. Because of his efforts, every Superman project bears a credit for original creators Joe Siegel and Joe Shuster, and publishers like DC and Marvel return original art to artists. 

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Kenneth Tsang

Kenneth Tsang

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Kenneth Tsang, the veteran Hong Kong actor whose career spanned 50 years and various notable roles, died April 27 at a COVID-19 quarantine hotel in Hong Kong’s Tsim Sha Tsui district. He was 87. After returning from a trip to Singapore on Monday, the actor was found collapsed on the floor of his hotel room two days later, South China Morning Post reported. He tested negative for COVID-19 prior, had been vaccinated, and had no chronic illness. Tsang’s film credits include Die Another Day, A Better Tomorrow, The Replacement Killers, Rush Hour 2, The Killer, and more.

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Jim Hartz

NBC News’ Jim Hartz during the 1976 New Hampshire Democractic Primary on February 24, 1976

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Jim Hartz, the NBC news correspondent and anchor who co-hosted Today with Barbara Walters in the 1970s, died April 17th according to The New York Times. He was 82. The Times reported that Hartz’s cause of death was chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Hartz was 34 when he started working at Today, succeeding anchor Frank McGee in 1974 and winning the job over seasoned personalities Tom Brokaw and Tom Snyder. Although he only anchored Today for two years, his coverage included important historical moments such as President Richard M. Nixon’s resignation, the end of the Vietnam War and the American Bicentennial. During his decade as a New York anchor, he covered local and national stories, including Robert F. Kennedy’s funeral and the Watergate scandal.

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David M. Jones

David M. Jones

Credit: Courtesy of Janice Gerson-Jones

Special effects artist David M. Jones died April 8 of complications from cancer. He was 74 years old. Jones was best known as the special-effects supervisor on the original 1977 Star Wars, though he also lent his expertise to other films over the years, including 1979’s Battlestar Galactica, 1992’s Batman Returns, and 1997’s Air Force One. In addition to movies, Jones worked on the 1989-1990 Budweiser Bud Bowl Super Bowl commercials and directed the creation of Walt Disney World’s Epcot ride Choose Your Tomorrow in 1983.

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Jacques Perrin

Jacques Perrin

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Jacques Perrin, the prolific French actor, director, and producer who starred in more than 70 European movies over the course of his multi-decade career, died April 21 at the age of 80, his family confirmed. Some of Perrin’s best-known roles include playing the courageous photojournalist in director Costa-Gavras’ Oscar-winning 1969 film Z and an elderly filmmaker looking back on his childhood in 1988’s Oscar-winning Cinema Paradiso

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Robert Morse

Mad Men Season 7, Gallery Bertram Cooper (Robert Morse)

Credit: AMC

Robert Morse, the Tony- and Emmy-winning actor who memorably portrayed Bertram Cooper on seven seasons of the AMC drama Mad Men, died on April 20 at age 90. His talent agent confirmed to EW that the star died after a “short illness,” after amassing a career that included notable performances on stage and screen, including his beloved leading role in the 1961 play How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying and its 1967 film adaptation.

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DJ Kay Slay

DJ Kay Slay

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DJ Kay Slay, prolific hip-hop disc jockey and record executive, died April 17 due to complications from COVID-19. He was 55. The DJ, real name Keith Grayson, first burst into the scene as a graffiti artist, adapting the infamous moniker Drama King. Kay Slay became a prominent DJ in the mixtape scene in the early 2000s, working with the likes of Nas, Ghostface Killah, Busta Rhymes, Fabolous, and Fat Joe throughout the course of his career. He released six studio albums, including the recent The Soul Controller in 2021. The New York Times coined the late DJ “Hip-Hop’s One-Man Ministry of Insults” due to his ability to capture high-profile feuds in his mixtapes, including Ja Rule vs. 50 Cent and Nas vs. Jay-Z.

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Art Rupe

Art Rupe

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Music executive Art Rupe, founder of the trailblazing R&B and rock ‘n’ roll label Specialty Records, died April 15 at his home in Santa Barbara, Calif. He was 104. An inductee of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Blues Hall of Fame, Rupe’s label helped launch the careers of Little Richard, Sam Cooke, and Lloyd Price, among others, releasing a number of hits that created the foundation of rock and roll in the 1950s: Little Richard’s “Tutti Frutti,” Price’s “Lawdy Miss Clawdy,” Larry Williams’ “Dizzy Miss Lizzy.” Along with his illustrious career in music, Rupe also started his own gas company, Artex Oil Company, in the ’50s, and, later in life, founded Arthur N. Rupe Foundation, a philanthropic foundation that supports public policy research, education, and advocacy.

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Liz Sheridan

Liz Sheridan on ‘Seinfeld’

Credit: Everett Collection

Liz Sheridan, the veteran actress best known for playing Jerry’s adoring mother on Seinfeld and the nosy neighbor Mrs. Ochmonek on ALF, died April 15 of natural causes. She was 93. Born in 1929 in Rye, N.Y., Sheridan began her show business career as a singer and dancer in New York City nightclubs in the ’50s. She met and fell in love with a young James Dean in 1952, and detailed their romance in her 2000 memoir Dizzy & Jimmy: My Life With James Dean. Appearing in various TV and theater productions throughout the ’60s and ’70s, Sheridan scored her first major recurring role as Raquel Ochmonek on ALF, which ran from 1986 to 1990. But her biggest spotlight came playing Jerry Seinfeld‘s doting mom, Helen, on his titular sitcom. She appeared in 21 episodes over the course of the show and was the only cast member aside from the four leads to show up at least once every season.

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Archie Eversole

Archie Eversole

Credit: Archie Eversole/Instagram

Arthur “Archie” Eversole, the Atlanta rapper best known for his 2002 hit “We Ready,” died April 3 after being shot at a gas station nine days earlier. He was 37. DeKalb County police said that Eversole’s brother, Alexander Kraus, has been arrested and charged with his murder.

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Gilbert Gottfried

Gilbert Gottfried

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Gilbert Gottfried died on April 12 at age 67, following a previously undisclosed illness. The comedian and actor known for his distinctive shrill voice had an extensive career as a voice actor, starting with Disney’s Aladdin in 1992, in which he played the villainous parrot, Iago. He also famously voiced the Aflac Duck in commercials for the insurance company until 2011. His notable film roles include Beverly Hills Cop II, Problem Child 1 and 2, and House Party 3. He also appeared on numerous television shows over the years, including a memorable stint as a Comedy Central Roast comic, taking jabs at the likes of David Hasselhoff, Seth MacFarlane, Joan Rivers, Donald Trump, and more.

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Rae Allen

Rae Allen

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Rae Allen, best known for her memorable supporting roles in The Sopranos and A League of Their Own, died April 6 of natural causes at age 95. Her first major movie role came in the Oscar-nominated 1958 baseball comedy Damn Yankees, an adaptation of the stage production in which she also starred), and she went on to have recurring roles on television shows such as All in the FamilySoapSeinfeld, and Grey’s Anatomy, as well as minor roles in films like A League of Their Own and Stargate. Allen earned three Tony Award nominations throughout her career, and won Best Featured Actress in a Play for the 1971 production of And Miss Reardon Drinks A Little.

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Bobby Rydell

Bobby Rydell

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Bobby Rydell, teen idol of the late-’50s and early-’60s, died April 5 at age 79. Known for his hits “Kissin’ Time,” “Wild One,” and “Swingin’ School,” Rydell also starred in the 1963 musical Bye Bye Birdie opposite Ann-Margret. Throughout his career, Rydell racked up 34 Top 100 hits and sold over 25 million albums, making him one of the most successful acts of his era. His name became familiar to future generations thanks to the 1978 film Grease, which named Danny and Sandy’s iconic high school after the crooner. 

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Marvin J. Chomsky

Marvin Chomsky

Credit: Everett Collection

Marvin J. Chomsky, the prolific director and producer whose credits include the groundbreaking TV series Roots, Gunsmoke, and Star Trek, among others, died peacefully in his sleep on March 28. He was 92. An eight-time nominee, Chomsky has won Emmys for his work on the 1978 miniseries Holocaust, 1982 TV film Inside the Third Reich, and 1986 miniseries Peter the Great. In film, his expansive credits include Attica, Evel Knievel, Brotherhood of the Rose, The Deliberate Stranger, Tank, and more. In a statement, Chomsky’s son, producer Peter Chomsky, remembered his father as an inspiration: “I am so proud of the work he did and hope he is remembered not only for his incredible contributions to our industry, but also for the stories he chose to tell about real events which helped to both entertain and inform his audience,” Peter said. “He will always have a place in my heart and continue to motivate me day in and day out. He’s the reason I aspire to find projects that can make a difference too… My dad really made a difference in our world and that is something very special!”

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June Brown

June Brown

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June Brown, best known for playing the role of Dot Cotton in the long-running BBC soap opera EastEnders, died April 3. She was 95. Following her first credited role in The Case of the Frightened Lady, Brown appeared in numerous films throughout the 70’s and 80’s including Sunday Bloody Sunday, Murder by Decree, The Prince and the Pauper, The Mambo Kings, and Bean. She joined the cast of EastEnders in 1985 and went on to be nominated for a Best Actress BAFTA for her work in 2009. In addition to film, Brown had a long career in television and theater. She was awarded the lifetime achievement award at the British Soap Awards in 2005 and in 2008, Brown was appointed a Member of the Order of the British Empire and Officer of the Order of the British Empire in 2022.

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Tabby and Bunny Diamond

Lloyd “Judge” Ferguson, Fitzroy “Bunny” Simpson, Donald “Tabby” Shaw aka Tabby Diamond

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Two members of the Mighty Diamonds, a pioneering reggae trio formed in 1969 that rose to prominence in the ’70s, died within a few days of one another. Tabby Diamond (left), born Donald Shaw, was shot and killed outside his home in Kingston, Jamaica on Mar. 29 at age 66. Three days later, on April 1, Bunny Diamond (center), born Fitzroy Simpson, died April 1, at age 70. Both deaths were reported by the New York Times. Though Bunny Diamond’s cause of death has yet to be determined, he was in declining health after suffering a stroke in 2015 and also had diabetes. Shaw and Simpson formed The Mighty Diamonds with their classmate Lloyd Ferguson, who went by Judge Diamond. The Mighty Diamonds are perhaps best known for their debut album, 1976’s Right Time, regarded as a landmark in reggae music. 

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Estelle Harris

Estelle Harris as Estelle Costanza Seinfeld

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Estelle Harris, best known for her role as pushy sitcom mom Estelle Constanza on the Emmy-winning series Seinfeld, died April 2 from natural causes at the age of 93. She began her career in the 1970s, starring in several TV and radio commercials before making guest appearances on Law and Order, Night Court, and Brooklyn Bridge, among other TV shows. Harris joined Seinfeld in 1992, cementing her status as one of sitcom’s most memorable matriarchs. Her TV son, Jason Alexander, remembered his “TV mama” and “one of my favorite people” on social media following news of her death, writing, “The joy of playing with her and relishing her glorious laughter was a treat.” Harris’ TV and film credits also include Married With Children, Mad About You, Suite Life of Zack and Cody, the Toy Story franchise, Stand and Deliver, and Odd Couple 2.

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Paul Herman

Paul Herman

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Paul Herman, best known for playing club owner Peter “Beansie” Gaeta on The Sopranos and for his roles in mob films like Goodfellas and The Irishman, died March 29. He was 76. Herman’s roles included appearances in films such as Once Upon a Time in America, The Last Temptation of Christ, American Hustle, Bullets Over Broadway, Goodfellas, CasinoThe Irishman, and Silver Linings Playbook. In addition to his Sopranos role, he appeared in television shows such as Miami Vice, The Equalizer, and Entourage.

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Tom Parker

Tom Parker

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Tom Parker, a singer for the British-Irish boy band the Wanted, died March 30 from stage-four brain cancer. He was 33. Parker’s wife, actress Kelsey Parker (née Hardwick), said he passed “peacefully” with family by his side. The singer-songwriter announced his diagnosis in October 2020, sharing that he had undergone chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Parker formed the Wanted in 2009 with fellow members Max George, Siva Kaneswaran, Jay McGuiness, and Nathan Sykes. The group split in 2014 after releasing three albums and several chart-topping hits, including “All Time Low” and “Glad You Came.” The band also headlined the 2013 E! reality show The Wanted Life, centered on the making of their third album as they lived together in a Hollywood Hills home, which ran for one season. 

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Taylor Hawkins

Taylor Hawkins pose during a photo shoot at the Intercontinental Hotel in Sydney, New South Wales.

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Taylor Hawkins, longtime Foo Fighters drummer, died March 25 at the age of 50. Hawkins joined the Grammy-nominated rock band in 1997 following the departure of William Goldsmith, making his studio debut in the group’s 1999 third album, There Is Nothing Left to Lose. In addition to his work with Dave Grohl and Co., Hawkins released three albums with his side project, Taylor Hawkins and the Coattail Riders, including 2019’s Get the Money. He recently starred in the band’s 2022 horror comedy Studio 666. In their remembrance, the Foo Fighters said Hawkins’ “musical spirit and infectious laughter will live on with us all forever.”

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William Hurt

WILLIAM HURT

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William Hurt, Oscar-winning actor best known for his roles in films such as Body Heat, Broadcast NewsChildren of a Lesser God, and A History of Violence, died March 13 from prostate cancer. Between 1985 and 1987, Hurt scored three consecutive Best Actor Oscar nominations, winning for his first, Kiss of the Spider Woman. Later in his career, the acclaimed actor joined the Marvel Cinematic Universe as Secretary of State Thaddeus Ross, making his final film appearance in 2021’s Black Widow.

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Brent Renaud

Brent Renaud attends the International Documentary Association 2014 IDA Documentary Awards at Paramount Studios

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Off to War and Last Chance High documentarian Brent Renaud was shot and killed in Irpin, Ukraine on March 13, when the vehicle he was traveling in was targeted by Russian forces. Renaud — a Directors Guild of America Award- and Documentary Emmy-nominated director — was in the war-torn region making a documentary about the global refugee crisis amid Vladimir Putin’s attacks on the Ukrainian people.

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Bobbie Nelson

Bobbie Nelson

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Bobbie Nelson, sister of Willie Nelson and the original pianist and singer for the Willie Nelson and Family Band, died March 11 at the age of 91. Nelson was raised in Abbot, Texas, where she learned to play the piano as a child before joining her musical family as a teenager. Her brother Willie invited her to join the band in 1972 after signing with Atlantic Records. Nelson appeared on numerous albums, including Red Headed StrangerShotgun WillieStardustTo Lefty and From Willie. In 2007, she released her debut album Audiobiography. Along with her brother, Nelson was also the author of two books: a memoir titled Me and Sister Bobbie: True Tales of The Family Band and a children’s book called Sister, Brother, Family: An American Childhood in Music.

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Emilio Delgado

Emilio Delgado

Credit: Zach Hyman

Emilio Delgado, best known for playing Luis, owner of The Fix-It Shop on Sesame Street, died Mar. 10 at age 81. Credited with playing the longest running role for a Mexican-American on U.S. television, Delgado joined Sesame Street in 1971 and played Luis until 2016. Delgado originally ran the Fix-It Shop with Raul Julia, who joined the cast the same year he did, though Julia departed in 1972. Delgado had previously said he considered himself “one of the luckiest guys” to have been part of the beloved children’s show. 

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Mitchell Ryan

Mitchell Ryan

Credit: James Sorensen/20th Century Fox Film Corp./Courtesy Everett Collection

Mitchell Ryan, a veteran character actor whose credits included the original Lethal Weapon, the gothic soap opera Dark Shadows, and the ABC sitcom Dharma & Greg, died March 4 of congestive heart failure. He was 88. In a career that spanned more than 50 years, Ryan appeared in more than 100 movies and TV shows, including such 1970s classics as The Friends of Eddie Coyle, popular hits like Star Trek: The Next Generation and The Golden Girls, and cult favorites including Hot Shots! Part Deux. He also played retired-general-turned-heroin-smuggler Peter McAllister in 1987’s Lethal Weapon, memorably exiting the film in a massive explosion in an overturned car, and starred as Greg’s eccentric, boozy father on Dharma & Greg. “Today a man becomes an actor by going to university and studying his craft. I came up in a different time,” Ryan wrote in his 2021 memoir, Fall of a Sparrow. “I found my way in the school of hard knocks and the university that is the theater itself.”

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Johnny Brown

Portrait of Johnny Brown of the television show ‘Good Times’ Los Angeles, California, September 29, 1977.

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Johnny Brown, the actor, comedian, and singer best remembered for his role as housing project superintendent Nathan Bookman on Good Times, died March 2 at age 84. Known as a versatile performer, an animated actor, and a skilled impressionist, Brown spent three seasons on the sketch comedy show Laugh-In in the early 1970s; writer Allan Manings later became a producer on Good Times and brought Brown over to the CBS sitcom. The actor joined the Norman Lear–produced show in 1975, midway through its second season, playing the oft-ridiculed superintendent Bookman. He also appeared in numerous other TV shows, including MaudeNight Gallery, and The Jeffersons.

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John Stahl

John Stahl played Richard Karstark in Game of Thrones.

Credit: HBO

John Stahl, the Scottish actor known for playing Rickard Karstark on Game of Thrones, died March 2 on the Scottish Isle of Lewis. He was 68. Stahl portrayed the treasonous Thrones character on the HBO series’ second and third seasons, taking over the role from Steven Blount, who played Karstark in season 1. Stahl was also known for the Scottish soap opera Take the High Road (on which he starred from 1982 to 2003) and for his many appearances on stage in his native country. “We are deeply saddened to hear of the death of John Stahl,” the National Theatre of Scotland wrote on Twitter. “His passing is a huge loss to the industry, and he will be sorely missed.”

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Tim Considine

Tim Considine

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Tim Considine, an actor best known for his roles on The Adventures of Spin and Marty and My Three Sons, died March 3 at 81. Mystery fans will also recall that he brought beloved amateur sleuth Frank Hardy to the small screen in The Hardy Boys: The Mystery of the Applegate Treasure and The Hardy Boys: The Mystery of the Ghost Farm. Considine ‘s other screen credits included the TV shows BonanzaThe FugitiveMedical CenterGunsmoke, and The Smith Family and the films The Clown, Ray of Sunshine, The Daring Dobermans, and The Shaggy Dog.

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Kirk Baily

Kirk Baily on ‘Salute Your Shorts’

Credit: Nickelodeon

Kirk Baily, the actor best known for playing the lunkheaded camp counselor Kevin “Ug” Lee on the Nickelodeon sitcom Salute Your Shorts, died Feb. 27 at 59. Salute Your Shorts aired for two seasons, from 1991 to 1993, and was one of Nickelodeon’s first live-action comedy series. Based on Steve Slavkin’s book Salute Your Shorts: Life at Summer Camp, it followed the rascals at Camp Anawanna as they engaged in various high jinks and vexed Ug in every way possible. Baily went on to appear in such films as 3 Ninjas: High Noon at Mega MountainThe Sixth Man, and Houseguest, and his other TV credits included Melrose PlaceStar Trek: Voyager, and Felicity. Baily also found a niche as a voice actor, working on movies like Big Hero 6BumblebeeFrozen, and The SpongeBob Movie: Sponge on the Run, as well as anime series like Trigun and Cowboy Bebop.

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Ralph Ahn

NEW GIRL

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Ralph Ahn, a character actor best known for portraying the largely silent but ever-insightful Tran on New Girl, died Feb. 26 at 95. Ahn appeared on six episodes of the Fox sitcom, including their 2018 series finale. “He gave so much with literally no lines,” his costar Jake Johnson wrote in a tribute posted on social media. “I loved when he was on set.” Ahn’s other screen credits included Gilmore Girls, The Shield, The Golden Girls, ER, and Suddenly Susan.

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Ned Eisenberg

Ned Eisenberg

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Ned Eisenberg, a veteran character actor best known for his role as defense attorney Roger Kressler on the long-running crime drama Law & Order: Special Victims Unit, died of cancer Feb. 27. He was 65. A New York native, Eisenberg began his career in theater, performing in Brighton Beach Memoirs, The Green Bird, and Golden Boy, among others, and co-founding the theater company Naked Angels in 1987. His film credits included Key Exchange, Last Man Standing, Head of State, World Trade Center, and Limitless, while his TV credits included The Equalizer, Miami Vice, 30 Rock, Bull, Mare of Easttown, The Blacklist, and The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel.

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The Amazing Jonathan

Amazing Johnathan

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The Amazing Jonathan, the irreverent magician and stand-up comedian who was a longtime headliner on the Las Vegas Strip and a fixture on late-night TV, died Feb. 22 at 63 following a long battle with heart disease. Born Johnathan Edward Szeles in Detroit, the self-described “Freddy Krueger of comedy” got his start as a street magician in San Francisco and became known for shocking stunts like (seemingly) spiking his own tongue and sucking on his own dangling eyeball. He appeared on dozens of TV shows over the course of his career, including Comedy Central’s One Night Stand and Premium Blend, Criss Angel’s Mindfreak, HBO’s Young Comedian’s Special, and Late Night With David Letterman. Szeles had a popular residency at the Golden Nugget in Las Vegas; performed for two presidents; co-created a game show called Ruckus with Merv Griffin; scored his own one-hour special, Wrong on Every Level; and was the subject of a 2019 Hulu film, The Amazing Johnathan Documentary.

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Mark Lanegan

Mark Lanegan

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Mark Lanegan, the baritone-voiced grunge pioneer who fronted the rock band Screaming Trees and later served as a member of Queens of the Stone Age and the Gutter Twins, died Feb. 22 at 57. Formed in Ellensburg, Wash., in 1985, Screaming Trees were influential in the early grunge movement and released seven studio albums and five EPs before their dissolution in 2000. Lanegan also had a long solo career and published a memoir, Sing Backwards and Weep, in 2020.

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Gary Brooker

Gary Brooker of Procol Harum

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Gary Brooker, the Procol Harum frontman who co-wrote and sang the pro-rock band’s biggest hit, “A Whiter Shade of Pale,” died Feb. 19 at 76. “Gary’s charisma was by no means confined to the stage,” the band said in a statement. “He lit up any room he entered, and his kindness to a multilingual family of fans was legendary. He was notable for his individuality, integrity, and occasionally stubborn eccentricity.” Brooker put out 13 albums with the band, but “A Whiter Shade of Pale” remained their most successful track and was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1998. Brooker also worked as a solo artist, collaborating with Eric Clapton, Bill Wyman, Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr, and others.

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Nightbirde

AMERICA’S GOT TALENT

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Nightbirde, a breakout contestant on season 16 of America’s Got Talent, died after a battle with cancer. She was 31. Born Jane Marczewski, the Ohio native wowed judges of the NBC competition series in June 2021 with an audition of an original song, “It’s Okay,” that chronicled her battle with cancer in her lungs, spine, and liver, making it to the final live rounds before bowing out of the series to focus on her health after it took a turn for the worse. Nightbirde told the judges she had a “2 percent chance of survival” — “but 2 percent isn’t 0 percent. 2 percent is something and I wish people knew how amazing it is, adding, “It’s important that everyone knows that I’m so much more than the bad things that happen to me.”

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Jamal Edwards

Jamal Edwards

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Jamal Edwards, an author, director, and music pioneer who helped launch the careers of notable British artists, including Rita Ora, Ed Sheeran, and Jessie J, died on Feb. 20 after a sudden illness, his mother confirmed. Edwards began his career in entertainment in 2006, founding SmokeyBarz TV (SBTV) and highlighting rising talent that would become today’s biggest global artists. An ambassador for Prince Charles’ youth charity ​​The Prince’s Trust, Edwards received an MBE (Member of the British Empire) award for his contributions to music in 2014. Clarence House, the royal residence of Prince Charles and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, remembered Edwards as “an inspiration to so many” on Twitter, while Ora wrote that “no words can describe how grateful I am to [have] been in your presence” on Instagram.

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Lindsey Pearlman

Lindsey Pearlman

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Lindsey Pearlman, a TV actress who appeared on General Hospital and Chicago Justice, was found dead in Los Angeles on Feb. 18 after going missing days before. She was 43. Authorities had asked the public for help locating her after she did not return home, causing concern among her family and friends. A Chicago native, Pearlman also had roles on the series Vicious, The Ms. Pat ShowEmpireSneaky PeteThe PurgeAmerican Housewife, and Selena: The Series.

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David Brenner

Film Editor David Brenner

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Oscar-winning film editor David Brenner died suddenly on Feb. 17 at his home in West Hollywood, according to The Hollywood Reporter. He was 59. Brenner shared his Oscar with co-editor Joe Hutshing for Oliver Stone’s 1989 film Born on the Fourth of July; it was one of nine films he collaborated on with Stone. Brenner, who was working on James Cameron’s much-anticipated Avatar sequels at the time of his death, cut some of Hollywood’s biggest movies throughout his career, including both versions of Zack Snyder’s Justice League, Man of Steel, Batman v Superman: Dawn of JusticeIndependence Day, The Patriot, The Day After Tomorrow, Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides, and more.

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Frank Pesce

Frank Pesce

Credit: Everett Collection

Frank Pesce, a beloved character actor whose many credits included Top GunBeverly Hills CopParadise Alley, and Flashdance, died Feb. 6 due to complications of dementia. He was 75. A New York City native, Pesce began his showbiz career in the late 1970s, landing guest roles on TV shows like Police Story and Kojak. He’d go on to appear on Knight Rider, The Greatest American Hero, Miami Vice, Matlock, and Who’s the Boss? Pesce also had a fruitful film career, appear inRocky, American Gigolo, Creed, and 29th Street, a film inspired by his own life.

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Ivan Reitman

Ivan Reitman

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Ivan Reitman, director of Ghostbusters, died Feb. 12 in his sleep. He was 75. Reitman got his start in film in the mid-70s, producing two David Cronenberg movies before hitting it big with 1978’s Animal House, which became the highest grossing comedy of its time. Reitman’s directorial debut was 1979’s Meatballs, featuring Bill Murray in his first starring role. The ’80s and ’90s brought a string of hits for Reitman including Stripes, Ghostbusters, TwinsGhostbusters II, Kindergarten Cop, BeethovenJunior, Space Jam, and Six Days, Seven Nights. Most recently Reitman produced the 2021 sequel Space Jam: A New Legacy and his son Jason carried on the Ghostbusters legacy with Ghostbusters: Afterlife

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Ian McDonald

Ian McDonald

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Ian McDonald, a founding member of the rock bands King Crimson and Foreigner, died at his home in New York on Feb. 9 at the age of 75. McDonald formed King Crimson in 1968 with Robert Fripp, Michael Giles, Greg Lake, and Peter Sinfield, playing woodwinds and keys. He then went on to create Foreigner in 1976 with Mick Jones, Lou Gramm, Dennis Elliott, Al Greenwood, and Ed Gagliardi, picking up the guitar. McDonald stayed with Foreigner until 1980 and recently reunited with the group’s surviving members in 2017 and 2018. 

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Betty Davis

Betty Davis

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Betty Davis, whose singing and songwriting informed generations of performers, died Feb. 9. She was 65. After graduating from New York’s Fashion Institute of Technology, Davis worked as a model for Wilhelmina and became one of the first Black models to be featured in the magazines Glamour and Seventeen. She became a duel force in singing and modeling, bringing her visionary performance skills to the studio and  becoming one of the first Black women to write, arrange, and produce her own albums. Most recently, her music was featured in television shows such as Orange Is the New Black, Girlboss, Mixed-ish, and High Fidelity

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Douglas Trumbull

Douglas Trumbull

Credit: Everett Collection

Douglas Trumbull, the visual effects innovator known for his work on films including 2001: A Space OdysseyClose Encounters of the Third Kind, and Blade Runner, died Feb. 7, at 79. Born in Los Angeles, Trumbull got his start working at Graphic Films and was brought on to work on 2001 after cold-calling director Stanley Kubrick. In addition to his work on some of sci-fi’s most iconic films, Trumbull contributed to VFX on Silent Running, The Andromeda Strain, and Star Trek: The Motion Picture, and the Natalie Wood movie Brainstorm. He also served as executive producer on Harlan Ellison’s 1973 sci-fi series The Starlost and its 1980s telefilm, created Universal Studios’ Back to the Future: The Ride simulator, and pioneered numerous film tools, such as motion-control photography and miniature compositing.

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Monica Vitti

Monica Vitti

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Monica Vitti, an Italian actress best known for starring in Michelangelo Antonioni’s L’Avventura, La Notte, and L’Eclisse, died at age 90. Born in Rome, she started her career in theater, touring Germany as a member of an Italian acting troupe, but she appeared in Italian television shows throughout the 1950s. Vitti also starred in two English-language films: 1966’s Modesty Blaise and the 1979 romantic comedy An Almost Perfect Affair, which was shot at the Cannes Film Festival. She won a career Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival in 1995 in celebration of her work.

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Moses J. Moseley

Moses J. Moseley

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Moses J. Moseley, an actor known for playing one of Michonne’s zombie companions on the popular AMC series The Walking Dead, was found dead in Stockbridge, Ga., near Atlanta, on Jan. 26. He was 31. Moseley appeared on six episodes of TWD from 2012 to 2015, as the undead version of Mike, the boyfriend of Danai Gurira’s Michonne, whom she kept by her side — minus his arms and jaw — as one of her “pets.” Moseley appeared with Gurira and Theshay West on the cover of EW in August 2012. His other screen credits included HBO’s Watchmen, USA’s Queen of the South, and the films The Hunger Games: Catching Fire and Attack of the Southern Fried Zombies.

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Cheslie Kryst

Cheslie Kryst attends the world premiere of “Like A Boss” at SVA Theater on January 07, 2020 in New York City.

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Miss USA 2019 and Extra correspondent Cheslie Kryst died Jan. 30. She was 30. Authorities say Kryst died after jumping from a 60-story building in New York City. Kryst, an attorney, was crowned Miss USA as Miss North Carolina in May 2019. She and three other women — Nia Imani Franklin (Miss America) Kaliegh Garris (Miss Teen USA) and Zozibini Tunzi (Miss Universe) — became the first group of Black women to hold the titles in a single year.

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Howard Hesseman

Howard Hesseman attends the IMF 11th Annual Comedy Celebration at The Wilshire Ebell Theatre on November 4, 2017 in Los Angeles, California.

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Howard Hesseman, beloved for his sitcom roles in WKRP in Cincinnati and Head of the Class, died Jan. 29 in Los Angeles due to complications from colon surgery. He was 81. Hesseman first made his mark in TV with his role as radio disc jockey Johnny Fever in CBS’ WKRP in Cincinnati, which garnered him two Emmy nominations. He went on to star in other notable shows, including the original One Day at a Time, The Rockford Files, Laverne & Shirley, and The Bob Newhart Show before appearing in recent titles like Fresh Off the Boat, CSI, Psych, and That 70’s Show.  Hesseman also forayed into film, starring in This Is Spinal Tap (1984), Gridlock’d (1997), Doctor Detroit (1983), Police Academy 2: Their First Assignment (1985), Clue (1985), Flight of the Navigator (1986), and most recently, Martian Child (2007), Halloween II (2009), and Wild Oats (2016).

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Sister Janet Mead

Sister Nun Janet Mead during recording rehearsal at Festival Records, Pyrmont. April 2, 1974.

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Sister Janet Mead, a Catholic nun who became an unlikely pop star with a chart-topping rock version of the Lord’s Prayer in 1974, died Jan. 26 in her native Adelaide, Australia, after suffering from cancer, the Catholic Archdiocese of Adelaide confirmed. Her age was reported to be 83 or 84. Mead’s rendition of the Lord’s Prayer sold more than two million copies worldwide, reaching no. 4 on the Billboard Hot 100 and scoring a Grammy nomination for “Best Inspirational Performance.” (She lost the award to Elvis Presley.) Mead was known for her “Rock Masses” in Adelaide, where she encouraged her congregation to play instruments and sing in the style of the era’s popular music. The success of her Lord’s Prayer recording led to two albums, With You I Am and A Rock Mass, but Mead resisted publicity and calls to continue her music career, preferring to focus on ministry. “It was a complete shock when publicity… came my way,” she told Sydney’s Daily Telegraph in 1999. “Because I’d resolved to use all my powers to continue with the work I was doing rather than be sidetracked by the superficial kind of success that I was experiencing, it was very, very difficult.”

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Vachik Mangassarian

Vachik Mangassarian

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Vachik Mangassarian, a character actor who appeared in Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., died of COVID-19 related complications at age 78. Mangassarian’s big break came in 1978’s The South’s Shark and he went on to appear in shows such as Curb Your Enthusiasm; NCIS: Los Angeles; The Fall Guy; Murder, She Wrote; Murphy Brown; NYPD Blue; and more. His best known role came when he appeared on Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. as Qasim Zaghlul, an architect who attended a party with Skye (Chloe Bennett) and Melinda May (Ming-Na Wen). 

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Thierry Mugler

French fashion designer Thierry Mugler is pictured on October 10, 2014 in Friedrichstadt-Palace theater in Berlin after a dress rehearsal of the new show “The Wyld – Not of this world”. The world premiere is scheduled for October 23.

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Fashion designer Thierry Mugler, known for his futuristic designs in the ’80s and ’90s, died Jan. 23. He was 73. Born Manfred Thierry Mugler in Strasbourg, France in 1948, Mugler began designing clothes in 1971, eventually opening up his own Paris boutique seven years later. His broad-shouldered, ’40s-inspired clothing bore touches of science fiction and he continued to produce extravagant shows into the ’90s. In 1992, Mugler designed the fashions for George Michael’s “Too Funky” video and the following year he created the black dress worn by Demi Moore in Indecent Proposal. Though he left fashion in 2002, Mugler served as Beyoncé’s artistic advisor in 2009, designing her costumes for her “I Am…World Tour.” More recently, he designed Kim Kardashian’s show-stopping Met Gala outfit in 2019.

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Louie Anderson

Louie Anderson

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Louie Anderson — TV star, stand-up comedian, and former Family Feud host — died Jan. 21, due to complications from cancer at age 68. In recent years, Anderson starred on FX’s Baskets as Christine Baskets, mother of twins played by Zach Galifianakis. He won an Emmy for the role in 2016. Last year’s Coming 2 America was his final film appearance.

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Meat Loaf

Meat Loaf

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Meat Loaf, the singer behind the 1977 Bat Out of Hell rock opera album, died Jan. 20, at the age of 74. Born Marvin Lee Oday, Meat Loaf released numerous hit songs, including “Paradise by the Dashboard Light,” “Two Out of Three Ain’t Bad,” and “I’d Do Anything for Love (But I Won’t Do That).” He famously played the role of Eddie opposite Tim Curry and Susan Sarandon in the 1975 rock musical comedy The Rocky Horror Picture Show

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Hardy Krüger

Hardy Krüger

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German actor Hardy Krüger died “suddenly and unexpectedly” on Jan. 19 at age 93, according to his literary agent Peter Kaefferlein. The performer is perhaps best known for his work in the 1957 British film The One That Got Away, and for deserting from the Nazi army during World War II. He later continued to appear in war-focused films throughout the 1970s, including Barry Lyndon (1975), A Bridge Too Far (1977), and The Wild Geese (1978).

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Dick Halligan

(L-R) Dick Halligan, Jerry Weiss and Randy Brecker of the rock and roll band “Blood, Sweat And Tears” perform onstage at Steve Paul’s The Scene nightclub on November 25, 1967 in New York, New York.

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Dick Halligan, a founding member of the jazz-rock band Blood, Sweat & Tears, died Jan. 18 of natural causes. He was 78. EW confirmed his death through a rep for the musician’s daughter, Shana. Born in Troy, N.Y. in 1943, Halligan formed the band in 1967 with Al Kooper, Jim Fielder, Fred Lipsius, Randy Brecker, Jerry Weiss, Steve Katz and Bobby Colomby. A multi-instrumentalist, Halligan played trombone on Blood, Sweat & Tear’s first album, but shifted to keyboards and flute for the following three before leaving the band in 1971. Throughout the ’70s and ’80s Halligan composed and arranged music for several films, including the Chuck Norris movies A Force of One and The Octagon. In addition to his daughter, he is survived by his son-in-law, Eric, his grandson, Otis, and his stepson, Buddy.

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Gaspard Ulliel

Gaspard Ulliel

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Gaspard Ulliel died on Jan. 19 at age 37 in a skiing accident. Ulliel was a well-known name in France, working with some of the industry’s top actors and directors, including Bertrand Bonello’s 2015 biopic Saint Laurent where he played the French fashion mogul Yves Saint Laurent. His breakout performances included roles in Jean-Pierre Jeunet’s A Very Long Engagement, Bertrand Tavernier’s La Princesse de Montpensier, and Xavier Dolan’s It’s Only the End of The World, which won the actor a César Award in 2017 for his starring role alongside Marion Cotillard and Lea Seydoux. He made his English-language debut in 2007’s Hannibal Rising and stars alongside Oscar Isaac in Marvel’s upcoming Moon Knight series.

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André Leon Talley

Andre Leon Talley

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André Leon Talley, whose keen eye and sharp wit served the pages of Vogue for more than 40 years, died Jan. 18 at age 73. Born in 1948 in Washington, D.C., André Leon Talley, or ALT, was raised in North Carolina by his elegant grandmother who inspired in him an early love for fashion. Under the stewardship of current EIC Anna Wintour, Talley became Vogue‘s creative director, from 1988 to 1995, and was editor-at-large from 1998 to 2013. Additionally he acted as a fashion advisor to the Obamas in 2008, introducing Michelle Obama to the designer Jason Wu, who went on to design her inaugural gown. 

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Yvette Mimieux

Yvette Mimieux

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The 1960s star of hits such as The Time Machine and Where the Boys Are died Jan. 8 at the age of 80. Her other major titles include Platinum High School, Mr. Lucky, Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, Toys in the Attic, Joy in the Morning, and TV series The Most Deadly Game. She originated the role of Clara Johnson in Light in the Piazza opposite Olivia de Havilland as her mother. The film went on to be adapted into a Broadway musical. Mimieux was also a writer, penning TV movies such as Hit Lady and Lady Boss, which she also starred in. 

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Wavy Navy Pooh

Rapper Wavy Navy Pooh performs onstage during Hot 107.9 Who’s Hot Artist Showcase Concert at Believe Music Hall on July 09, 2021 in Atlanta, Georgia.

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Miami rapper Wavy Navy Pooh, best known for his song “M.I.A.M.I. (Murder is a Major Issue),” died Jan. 14 at the age of 28 from a reported drive-by shooting. Born Shandler Beaubien, the rapper has released two albums, 2020’s Murder is a Major Issue and 2021’s Endangered, as well as the singles “Gang Gang,” “Guwop,” “Slidin,” and “Money On My Head,” with his record label, Quality Control Music.

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Jordan Cashmyer

’16 and Pregnant’ star Jordan Cashmyer

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Jordan Cashmyer, who starred in season 5 of the MTV reality series 16 and Pregnant, died in her native Maryland at the age of 26, her mother Jessica confirmed on Jan. 16. Cashmyer appeared in the fifth season of 16 and Pregnant in 2014, which chronicled her struggles with finding employment and housing while she was pregnant with her daughter, Genevieve “Evie,” with then-boyfriend Derek Taylor. Prior to her death, Cashmyer, who struggled with addiction, celebrated one year of sobriety in January 2021.

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Fred Parris

Fred Parris of The Five Satins

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Fred Parris, the leader of the doo-wop group the Five Satins who penned their signature hit “In the Still of the Night,” died Jan. 13 after a brief illness. He was 85. Parris co-founded the group in his hometown of New Haven, Conn., in 1954, and wrote the 1956 classic’s lyrics while on guard duty at a U.S. Army base in Philadelphia. The Five Satins recorded “In the Still of the Night” in the basement of a New Haven church, a modest start for a song that would become one of the most enduringly popular of its era. “I never expected it to have so much of an impact,” Parris recalled in a 2014 interview with the New Haven Register. “I didn’t know if they were going to listen to it 15 minutes later, let alone 50 years… The song has been real good to me.”

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Rosa Lee Hawkins

Rosa Lee Hawkins of Dixie Cups

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Rosa Lee Hawkins, a member of the musical girl group the Dixie Cups, died Jan. 11 due to complications from surgery. She was 76. The Dixie Cups originally consisted of Hawkins and her sister Barbara Ann, along with their cousin Joan Marie Johnson, and were known for a string of hits in the mid-1960s. Their song “Chapel of Love” hit no. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1964, and the group released the first popular version of “Iko Iko” the following year. Hawkins and her sister continued to perform together over the following decades, even after Johnson’s death in 2011.

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Clint Arlis

Clint Arlis

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Clint Arliss, a contestant on season 11 of The Bachelorette, died Jan. 11 at age 34. Arlis’ fellow contestant Nick Viall, who ultimately won their season, remembered Arlis as “a very kind, unique, and talented person,” while Kaitlyn Bristowe, the woman whose heart they vied for, called his death an “absolute tragedy.”

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Maria Ewing

Actress Rebecca Hall and her mother Maria Ewing

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Maria Ewing, a renowned opera singer and the mother of actress Rebecca Hall, died Jan. 9 at the age of 71. Born in 1950 and the youngest of four, Ewing — the daughter of a white Dutch mother and African-American father — made her Metropolitan Opera debut in 1976 via Mozart’s Le Nozze di Figaro (The Marriage of Figaro). She continued to perform at the Met, culminating in 96 performances that concluded with her role as Marie in Berg’s 1997 opera Wozzeck. Ewing met her future husband, Peter Hall, in 1978 while performing in Mozart’s Cosi Fan Tutte at Britain’s Glyndebourne Festival. Hall would go on to direct Ewing in muliple performances throughout her career, including 1986’s Salome at the LA Opera and 1987’s Nozze.

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Robert Durst

Imprisoned Real Estate Heir Robert Durst Appears In Court For Hearing In Murder Case

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Robert Durst, the enigmatic New York real estate scion who was convicted of murdering his best friend to prevent her from telling authorities she helped cover up his wife’s killing, and whose participation in the high-profile true-crime miniseries The Jinx helped seal his fate, died in custody Jan. 10, at 78, while serving a life sentence. In addition to being convicted in the execution-style slaying of his close confidante Susan Berman in 2000, Durst was long suspected of foul play in the mysterious disappearance of his wife, Kathleen (née McCormack), in New York in 1982, and the death and dismemberment of his neighbor Morris Black in Texas later that year.  In one of the most shocking and consequential moments in true-crime television, The Jinx ended with a hot-mic bombshell in which Durst could be heard muttering to himself in the bathroom, “That’s it, you’re caught,” and saying he “killed them all, of course.”

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Bob Saget

Bob Saget Americas Funniest Home Videos

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Bob Saget, actor and comedian who found success as Danny Tanner on Full House and as host of America’s Funniest Home Videos, died Jan. 9. He was 65. Saget, whose wholesome, family-friendly image belied his rather off-color stand-up comedy, often used this dichotomy between his public personas to comedic effect in cameos in Half Baked, Entourage, and The Aristocrats. In addition to returning to the Tanner household for the Fuller House reboot, Saget also narrated all nine seasons of How I Met Your Mother, playing the older version of protagonist Ted Mosby. On Jan. 9, Saget was found unresponsive by security guards in a Ritz Carlton in Orlando and was later pronounced dead at the scene by the sheriff and fire departments. He is survived by his wife Kelly Rizzo and his three children. 

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Dwayne Hickman

Dwayne Hickman

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Dwayne Hickman, the TV executive and actor best known for his role as girl-infatuated teen Dobie Gillis in the CBS sitcom The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis, died on Jan. 9 from complications of Parkinson’s disease. Hickman began his career with minor roles in films like Captain Eddie and The Happy Years before foraying into television, starring in The Lone Ranger, The Loretta Young Show, and The Bob Cummings Show. His most memorable role came as Dobie Gillis, a high school teen who aspired to popularity, success, and the attention of beautiful girls in The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis. Hickman returned to his CBS roots in the late 1970s as a network executive, overseeing the development of shows like M*A*S*H, Maude, and Sister, Sister.

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Michael Lang

Woodstock co-producer and co-founder, Michael Lang, participates in the Woodstock 50 lineup announcement at Electric Lady Studios, March 19, 2019, in New York.

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Michael Lang, concert promoter and producer who co-created the 1969 Woodstock festival, died Jan. 8. He was 77. Born in Brooklyn, Lang moved to Woodstock, N.Y. where he met Artie Kornfeld. Together they developed the idea of a festival to commemorate the social movements of the 1960s. With Kornfeld and partners John P. Roberts and Joel Rosenman, Lang organized the planning of the Woodstock Music and Arts Festival, held from Aug. 15-18 on the farm of Max Yasgur.  Lang was portrayed by Jonathan Groff in the 2009 Ang Lee film Taking Woodstock

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Marilyn Bergman

Marilyn Bergman

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Marilyn Bergman, the songwriter who penned the lyrics for such iconic tunes as “The Way We Were” and “The Windmills of Your Mind” with her husband, Alan Bergman, died Jan. 8 of respiratory failure in Los Angeles. She was 93. The Bergmans were a decorated songwriting team, winning three Academy Awards, two Grammys, and four Emmys, among many other honors, and writing many popular songs including the Neil Diamond-Streisand duet “You Don’t Bring Me Flowers,” “It Might Be You” from Tootsie, and the themes from the sitcoms MaudeAlice, and Good Times. Marilyn Bergman was also the first woman on the board of directors of the American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers (ASCAP) and was later elected president and chairman, holding the position from 1994 to 2009.

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Sidney Poitier

Sidney Poitier On The Set

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Trailblazing actor Sidney Poitier — who paved the way for Black stars in Hollywood by becoming the first Black man to win the Best Actor Oscar — died Jan. 7. After his death, stars who walked in his footsteps (like Whoopi Goldberg and Viola Davis) paid tribute to the 94-year-old’s impactful career that included roles in movies Lilies of the Field, Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner, and In the Heat of the Night.  “No words can describe how your work radically shifted my life,” Davis said. “The dignity, normalcy, strength, excellence and sheer electricity you brought to your roles showed us that we, as Black folks, mattered!!!”

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Calvin Simon

Calvin Simon attends the 61st Annual GRAMMY Awards at Staples Center on February 10, 2019 in Los Angeles, California.

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Calvin Simon, a founding member of the pioneering funk music group Parliament-Funkadelic, died Jan. 6 at the age of 79. A West Virginia native, where he sang with a church choir for weekly radio broadcasts prior to his relocation to New Jersey with his family as a teen, Simon joined the group originally known as the Parliaments in the late 1950s, releasing hit singles like “(I Wanna) Testify” in 1967. Following a two year stint in the Vietnam War, Simon returned to the group and later joined Parliament-Funkadelic, a funk music collective of rotating musicians that released hits “Give Up the Funk” and “Flash Light,” among others. Simon left the band in 1978, returning to his gospel roots with the albums Share the News, It’s Not Too Late, and I Believe.  In 1997, he and other Parliament-Funkadelic members were inducted to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, and in 2019, the group received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award.

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Peter Bogdanovich

Peter Bogdanovich

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Peter Bogdanovich, the Oscar-nominated writer and director of iconic films like The Last Picture Show, What’s Up Doc, and Paper Moon, died Jan. 6 of natural causes. He was 82. The highly prolific director and film writer had a long and storied career that included films like Daisy MillerAt Long Last Love, They All LaughedNickelodeonSaint JackMask, and Targets. His personal life was almost as storied, thanks to his romantic relationships with model Cybill Shepherd (whom he met while filming The Last Picture Show) and 1980 Playboy Playmate of the Year Dorothy Stratten. In 1997, Bogdanovich authored Who the Devil Made It: Conversations With Legendary Directors, and in 2004, he released a second book called Who the Hell’s in It: Conversations With Hollywood’s Legendary Actors. His most recent projects were the 2014 Owen Wilson and Imogen Poots comedy She’s Funny That Way which premiered at the Venice Film Festival in 2018. He also took on acting roles, with his most prominent part as a psychotherapist in HBO’s The Sopranos.

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Jessie D

Jessie Daniels

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Jessie Lee Daniels, a.k.a. Jessie D, a founding member of the R&B and hip-hop group Force MDs, who helped paved the way for new jack swing, died Jan. 5 at 57. A native of Staten Island, Daniels founded Force MDs with his nephews Stevie D. Lundy, Antoine “T.C.D.” Lundy, and Rodney “Khalil” Lundy in 1981. Their blend of smooth R&B vocals with and hip-hop beats presaged the new jack swing movement that defined the rest of the decade. They were best known, however, for their quiet storm hits “Tender Love” and “Love is a House.”

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Jay Wolpert

Jay Wolpert

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Jay Wolpert, a producer and screenwriter known for his work on The Price Is Right and Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl, died Jan. 3 in Los Angeles after a battle with Alzheimer’s disease. He was 79. A Bronx native, Wolpert began his career in TV game shows after he won the Tournament of Champions on Jeopardy in the late 1960s. He worked as a producer on The Price Is Right from the time of its debut in 1972 until 1978, receiving a Daytime Emmy nomination for his efforts. Wolpert also created the CBS game show Double Dare and helped develop Family Feud, Match Game, and Card Sharks. After three decades, Wolpert pursued film and credited Nancy Meyers, his erstwhile assistant on The Price Is Right prior to her foray into film, for pushing him to write. He penned scripts and screenplays for Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl and The Count of Monte Cristo, among others.

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