How much mortgage interest can you deduct on your taxes?

How much mortgage interest can you deduct on your taxes?

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Moneywatch

By Zina Kumok


CBS News

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Mortgage interest is one of the most significant deductions you can make to reduce your taxable income.

David Sucsy/Getty Images


Everyone wants to reduce taxes. One of the best ways to do this is to maximize deductions.

Consumers used to rely on the mortgage interest deduction as a majorstay. But the past few decades have seen a lot of changes. Some homeowners might be better off not taking this deduction.

You can Use E-file here to determine how much tax preparation software you should use..

If you are interested in claiming it, you can read the following to find out how it works and if it makes sense to you.

How to deduct mortgage interest from federal tax returns

You can choose to take either the standard deduction or the detailed deduction when you file taxes. The standard deduction for married couples filing jointly in 2022 is $25,900, and for individuals it is $12,950. For those filing as head-of-household, the standard deduction is $19,000.

Only those who itemize their deductions are eligible for the mortgage interest deduction. You can’t deduct mortgage interest if you take the standard deduction. The standard deduction is so high that most homeowners would be better off not itemizing any deductions.

You should only itemize deductions if your total exceeds the standard deduction. If you need more help, you can either hire an accountant or do the math yourself.

Interest on a home equity loan, or line of credit can also be deducted as long as the home is listed in the collateral. You may not be allowed to deduct interest if another property is listed as collateral.

Depending on how large your mortgage is, you may be able to deduct mortgage interest. This can reduce your taxable income.

Tax preparation software can help you determine how much you should deduct. TurboTax makes it easy to get your taxes done correctly and you will receive your maximum refund..

How to deduct mortgage interest from state tax returns

You may be able, if your state has income tax, to deduct the mortgage interest from your state tax returns. The rules of each state will determine how much you are allowed to deduct and what other limits you may be able to apply.

You can deduct interest by using the numbers from your mortgage company’s 1098 form. If you don’t get a 1098 form from your mortgage company, it could mean that you paid less $600 in interest. You can still deduct mortgage interest. The total amount of interest you have paid will be calculated manually.

Some states have restrictions on the number of properties you can deduct mortgage interest from, while others allow you to deduct interest on all your homes.

How to qualify for the mortgage interest deduction

Only homeowners with mortgage debts less than $750,000 can deduct mortgage interest. If you are married filing separately, you can only deduct your mortgage interest if your mortgage debt is less than $375,000

The $1 million limit was once the limit, but this changed with the 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act.

Mortgage interest deductions for second homes

If you have Two homesYou can still deduct mortgage interest from federal taxes on a second residence. The collateral property must be listed on the loan to qualify. You can only deduct interest for one home, not your primary property.

If the second home is a rental property, however, the rules may be different. If this is the case, the deduction can only be taken if you live in the property more than 14 days or 10% of the time it is rented. It is considered a rental property and you cannot take the mortgage interest deduction if you don’t live there.

Are you still unsure about tax deductions? H&R Block experts can help you.

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